Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

August 29, 2016

gsl @ Savannah

GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released

Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C.

This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods.

The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

The file details for this release are:

ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.2.tar.gz
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.2.tar.gz.sig

The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/

GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License.

Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements.

Patrick Alken

=======

  • What is new in gsl-2.2:
    • updated gsl_linalg_cholesky_invert to use Level-2 BLAS

and added function gsl_linalg_pcholesky_invert

    • added function gsl_linalg_tri_invert for inverting

triangular matrices

    • fix GSL_EIGEN_SORT_VAL_{ASC,DESC} for nonsymmetric

eigensystems (Victor Zverovich)

    • added complete orthogonal decomposition routines

(gsl_linalg_COD)

    • bug fix where median calculation wasn't reset in

gsl_rstat_reset(); added gsl_rstat_quantile_reset() function
(reported by Pedro Donato)

    • added multivariate Gaussian random distribution

gsl_ran_multivariate_gaussian (Timothée Flutre)

    • added functions to estimate the 1-norm reciprocal condition

number for various matrix factorizations:
* gsl_linalg_cholesky_rcond
* gsl_linalg_QRPT_rcond

    • added functions gsl_linalg_QRPT_{lssolve,lssolve2} to

compute least squares solutions with the QRPT decomposition

    • added function gsl_permute_matrix()
    • added modified Cholesky factorization (gsl_linalg_mcholesky)

to handle symmetric indefinite matrices

    • added pivoted Cholesky factorization (gsl_linalg_pcholesky)

for ill-conditioned matrices

    • rewrote (real) Cholesky decomposition to use

a Level-2 blas algorithm instead of Level-1. Flop
count is about the same but the code is much simpler
and easier to follow

    • completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module,

including support for large problems; the user may
now control the linear solver used, the trust region
updating strategy, and the scaling method. In addition,
support has been added for the geodesic acceleration
step (Transtrum 2011) which can speed up convergence
on a wide class of problems.

    • added gsl_rstat_rms() for root mean square
    • optimized lmniel nonlinear least squares solver

(bug #46369)

    • improved precision in Bessel K0/K1 near x = 2

(Pavel Holoborodko, bug #47401)

    • added support for compressed row storage sparse

matrices (Alexis Tantet)

    • bug fix in convergence check of hypergeometric 2F1

function (bug #45926)

    • added gsl_multilarge_linear_lcurve() to compute

the L-curve for large linear systems

    • updated multilarge normal equations method to use

new Cholesky scaling for better numerical stability

    • added scaling to Cholesky routines to reduce the

condition number prior to factorization

by Patrick Alken at August 29, 2016 04:00 PM

August 28, 2016

apl @ Savannah

GNU APL 1.6 released

Hi,

I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.6 has been released.

This release contains:

* bug fixes,

* ⎕FIO (replaces FILE I>O native functions), and

* local variables in lambdas

All bugs reported before Aug. 25, 2016 were fixed.

The GNU APL project lives at: http://www.gnu.org/software/apl
and can be downloaded from: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/apl/ or any GNU mirror.

Bug reports and other suggestions are welcome at bug-apl@gnu.org.

Have fun!

Dr. Jürgen Sauermann
Author and Maintainer of GNU APL

by Jürgen Sauermann at August 28, 2016 02:42 PM

August 27, 2016

unifont @ Savannah

Unifont 9.0.02 Released

Unifont 9.0.02 is released. The package and related files can be downloaded at ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/unifont/unifont-9.0.02/

by Paul Hardy at August 27, 2016 04:44 PM

August 26, 2016

GNUnet News

August 25, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 26th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, August 26th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

August 25, 2016 02:07 PM

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Stefano Zacchiroli of Software Heritage

Software Heritage is a recently announced non-profit initiative to archive, organize, and share all publicly available software source code. Stefano Zacchiroli is a co-founder and current CTO of the Software Heritage project. He is a Board Director of the Open Source Initiative, member of FSF's High Priority Projects committee, and former 3-times Debian Project Leader.

Can you tell us a little about Software Heritage and what inspired you to create it?

Software Heritage's ambition is to be the memory of humanity when it comes to (Free) software. Our goal is to collect, preserve in the very long term, organize, and share all software that is publicly available in source code form. The vast majority of the corpus we target is the result of decades of work by the free software community. The rest of it will eventually (after copyright expiration) become free software too.

As for our inspiration to start the project, we were discussing seemingly unrelated topics: the cultural value of free software and the risk of losing some of it, the closed nature of state-of-the-art databases used in the IT industry to track the provenance of free software code, and the sad state of scientific reproducibility when software is used as part of scientific experiments. Software Heritage is the result of realizing that a comprehensive, curated archive of free software source code can help on all those fronts.

Can you tell us a little about the free software that powers software heritage?

The Software Heritage software stack is entirely free software. We use Debian GNU/Linux (main) on all our machines, be them bare metal servers or virtual machines. On top of them run our software foundations: PostgreSQL (knowledge base), Wordpress (main website), Phabricator (development forge), and Puppet (configuration management). Our business logic---source code crawling, ingestion, indexing, publishing on the Web, etc.---is implemented in Python 3 using several free software libraries and framework; some of those are: Psycopg2, Dulwich, Subvertpy, Celery, and Flask. All the code we develop ourselves is released under copyleft licenses (GNU AGPLv3 for public facing services, GNU GPLv3 for back-end code), with the exception of code meant to be reused in context where lax, permissively licenses are dominant (e.g., our Puppet modules, that we release under the Apache 2.0 license).

What features do you find unique about software heritage and what sets it apart from similar projects?

The field of digital preservation is luckily vast and full of initiatives that are all trying to prevent the risk of an upcoming digital dark age. The Internet Archive and the Archive Team are known to many free software hackers, but there are dozens of invaluable digital preservation projects out there. The peculiarity of Software Heritage is that we focus on source code, and that we aim at being exhaustive in that "little" niche. We love working with others though, and we are already doing so to make sure that the source code we archive can be cross-referenced with other important artifacts of software development (e.g., home pages, documentation, mailing lists, binaries, etc.) that others are already doing a great job at archiving.

As for our "style", we pride ourselves on our commitments to being a charitable initiative, to run the project openly and collaboratively, and to release all our own software as free software.

Why did you choose the GNU AGPLv3 and the GNU GPLv3 licenses for your software?

Copyleft licenses are the most natural choice for all sorts of critical software. They guarantee via legal means that not only the current version of some software is free, but also that all future adaptations of it will remain so.

Preserving the source code memory of humanity is a critical endeavor. It should be done transparently, as that allows everyone to review how the archival is being done, what safety measures are being put in place, etc. Additionally, the archived source code should be mirrored massively, as each additional independent copy reduces the chances of losing something. To that end archival software will be reused by diverse stakeholders and sometimes it will need to be adapted to fit new scenarios.

Releasing our software under copyleft licenses is first of all a contribution to operational transparency on what we are doing. Second, it creates a level playing field for everyone who will want to reuse our software, for archival or as yet unseen purposes.

How can individuals and organizations contribute?

I'm glad you asked! We're a very dedicated but also very small team, and we welcome help from all interested parties.

  • Developers can participate as they usually do in free software projects: join our development mailing list or IRC channel, and dive into our code to submit bug reports or patches.

  • Users can contribute by curating content on our wiki, that most notably hosts a suggestion box of endangered source code that we should archive. Raising awareness of the project by promoting it with peers and on social media is very welcome too.

  • Organizations can help by becoming testimonials for what we do and by joining our sponsorship program to support our work.

What's the next big thing for Software Heritage?

Up to now we've focused on creating a solid initial corpus for the Software Heritage archive. We're quite pleased with the result: the archive already contains more than 2.8 billion unique source code files, 600 million commits, and covers more than 22 million projects. And it is growing steadily as we keep up with changes pushed to tracked version control systems (e.g., GitHub repositories).

The next big thing is content retrieval. Users can already check if we have archived source code they care about, but they cannot yet browse or download it. This is our top priority. Delivering on it requires engineering work, computing resources (e.g., bandwidth), and administrative scaffolding (e.g., processes to deal with takedown notices). In parallel with this we keep on expanding the coverage of the archive and growing a distributed network of mirrors to avoid single points of failure of any kind. It's a lot of work, but it's necessary and also a lot of fun!

Enjoy this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series, featuring Brett Smith of dtrx.

August 25, 2016 01:30 PM

August 24, 2016

FSF Blogs

Only a short time left to support Libre Tea Computer Card; crowdfunding ends August 26th

We wrote previously about why you should support the Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices project. It's built around devices with interchangeable parts, based on unencumbered hardware standards, and with a dedication to protecting and promoting user freedom. The project's decision to raise funds via Crowd Supply means that you can support their work with anonymous payments, and without the use of proprietary JavaScript.

As we wrote previously:

The Libre Tea Computer Card is built with an Allwinner A20 dual core processor configured to use the main CPU for graphics; it has 2 GB of RAM and 8 GB of NAND Flash; and it will come pre-installed with Parabola GNU/Linux-libre, an FSF-endorsed fully-free operating system.

It's a device with a lot of potential, and purchasing one will help support the development of even more hardware that respects users' freedom. While we will have to make a final evaluation before granting Respects Your Freedom certification, we have high hopes given the history of the developers involved and the details currently available.

When we last wrote about the project, there was an outpouring of support, helping it get significantly closer to its funding goal (at the time of this writing, 85% there). But with just days left, we need to make one final push. Can you be the one to put the project over the top by backing the Libre Tea Computer Card? The final deadline is Friday, August 26th, so now is the time to act if you want to help promote the creation of devices whose software is fully under your control.

August 24, 2016 09:42 PM

August 23, 2016

GNUnet News

libbrandt GSoC final evaluation

The Google Summer of Code is about to end and it's time for an update on the libbrandt development.

The code can be cloned from this repository:
git clone git://gnunet.org/libbrandt

by Markus Teich at August 23, 2016 09:20 AM

August 22, 2016

FSF News

FSF Job Opportunity: Web Developer

The Free Software Foundation (FSF), a Massachusetts 501(c)(3) charity with a worldwide mission to protect computer user freedom, seeks a motivated and talented Boston-based individual to be our full-time Web Developer.

This position, reporting to the executive director, works closely with our sysadmin team to maintain and improve the FSF's Web presence. The FSF uses several different free software Web platforms in the course of its work, both internally and externally. These platforms are critical to work supporting the GNU Project, free software adoption, free media formats, and freedom on the Internet; and to opposing bulk surveillance, Digital Restrictions Management, software patents, and proprietary software.

We are looking for someone who is comfortable with keeping these systems up-to-date and working, as well as customizing them when necessary. While the main duties will relate to the backend systems, frontend experience with templates, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and design tools will be a big plus. The Web Developer will help lead major projects, such as the relaunch of https://www.fsf.org and migration of https://audio-video.gnu.org to GNU MediaGoblin. S/he will also be part of the team running the annual LibrePlanet conference as well as contribute to decisions about which new platforms to use or which existing ones to retire.

Examples of platforms maintained by the Web Developer include, but are not limited to:

  • CiviCRM
  • Drupal
  • MediaWiki
  • Plone / Zope
  • Ikiwiki
  • Request Tracker
  • Etherpad
  • CAS
  • GNU social
  • GNU MediaGoblin
  • Icecast

Because the FSF works globally and seeks to have our materials distributed in as many languages as possible, multilingual candidates will have an advantage. With our small staff of thirteen, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment at an office located in the heart of downtown Boston.

The FSF is a mature but growing organization that provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. This position is also a good starting point for anyone who might be interested in other roles on our technical team in the future.

Benefits and Salary

This job is a union position that must be worked on-site at the FSF's downtown Boston office. An on-site interview will be required with the executive director and other team members. The salary is fixed at $51,646/year and is non-negotiable. Other benefits include:

  • conference travel opportunities,
  • full family health coverage through Blue Cross/Blue Shield's HMO Blue program,
  • subsidized dental plan,
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually,
  • seventeen paid holidays annually,
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement,
  • 403(b) program through TIAA-CREF,
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases (based on government guidelines).

Application Instructions

Applications must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line "Web Developer". A complete application should include:

  • resume,
  • cover letter, and
  • links to any previous work online.

All materials must be in a free format. Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will probably be overlooked. No phone calls, please.

Applications must be received by Thursday, September 1, 2016 at 17:00 EDT.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law. We value diversity in our workplace. Women, people of color and LGBTQ individuals are strongly encouraged to apply.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. We are based in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

August 22, 2016 05:42 PM

FSF Blogs

Free Software Directory meeting recap for August 19th, 2016

Every week free software activists from around the world come together in #fsf on irc.freenode.org to help improve the Free Software Directory. This recaps the work we accomplished on the Friday, August 19th, 2016 meeting.

This week we had a guest leader, Yoni Rabkin (yrk), a long time volunteer on the FSF Compliance Lab Team. yrk did a great job leading the directory team and we thank them for their efforts.

The meeting started off with lots of new faces jumping in to help out. Guest37375 worked on updating the entry for WordNet, and mimi89999 updated the page for Alsaplayer. The channel worked together to add an initial entry for Kaku, and some candidates for deletion were also found. mattlav1 found a package that seemed to be out of commission, and yrk contacted the maintainers about getting an update. mew007 helped update the listing for Crossword Builder, and the channel spent some time tracking down licenses for several packages.

yrk did a great job leading the group and getting so many people involved. If you would like to join in on the fun, meet with us every Friday in #fsf on irc.freenode.org from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC).

August 22, 2016 03:06 PM

August 21, 2016

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20160822 ('Og Nomekop') released

GNU Parallel 20160822 ('Og Nomekop') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

Haiku of the month:

Want to monitor
many job outputs at once:
--tmuxpane
--ole-tange

New in this release:

  • --tmuxpane opens jobs in panes in tmux. Useful if you want to monitor progress of less than 100 simultaneous jobs.
  • --linebuffer now treats \r as line ending, too.
  • Perl changes forces use of floats to be given with leading zero, so 0.1 and not .1
  • --xapply renamed to --link.
  • Support for pdksh will fade until someone packages it for Ubuntu 16.
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use programs that use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --citation)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use programs that use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --citation)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at August 21, 2016 08:49 PM

German Arias

Second release of eiffel-iup

I’m glad to announce the second release of eiffel-iup. A wrapper that allow create graphical applications with Liberty Eiffel using the IUP toolkit. This second version add flat buttons and fix some errors. The main changes are in the names of some features, which now have names in the eiffel style. This is enough mature to create graphical interfaces. The package contains examples that show how use eiiffel-iup. So let me know if you have problems and Happy hacking!


by Germán Arias at August 21, 2016 05:54 AM

diffutils @ Savannah

diffutils-3.5 released [stable]

by Jim Meyering at August 21, 2016 05:41 AM

August 18, 2016

FSF Events

Event - "GNU Health Con 2016" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)

GNU Health Conference is this year celebrating the I International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2016. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 8 years.

Location: Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Las Palmas.

August 18, 2016 09:53 AM

August 17, 2016

GNUnet News

Rust implementation of GNUnet with GSoC - Final-term

This is the final week of the gnunet-rs project with Google Summer of Code. It has been challenging but also exceptionally rewarding. I hope to explain the final product and then touch on the future work. The repository can be found here, and my previous blog post here.

by kc1212 at August 17, 2016 05:41 AM

August 16, 2016

FSF Blogs

Free Software Directory meeting recap for August 12th, 2016

Every week free software activists from around the world come together in #fsf on irc.freenode.org to help improve the Free Software Directory. This recaps the work we accomplished on the Friday, August 12th, 2016 meeting.

Mordcai discovered that the Participation Guide's formatting was broken and got it fixed, and Mviinama helped fix some links as well. Donaldr3 approved a few minor changes, with updated versions for Bas55 and Anonymine. Nazghul needed an updated website and versions. Adfeno announced the creation of a script to help with licensing check, and updated projects on their todo list. The whole channel helped to discuss a project with a dependency on a package with a world-record candidate for longest licensing file. The resolution was to file an issue at the project seeking a fix for the licensing issue. The meeting ended with getting Adfeno's script up on the directory and helping choose a license for it.

It was a busy meeting, but there's still lots of work left to do. If you want to help out, join us every Friday in #fsf on irc.freenode.org from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC).

August 16, 2016 09:00 PM

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 19th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, August 19th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

August 16, 2016 03:32 PM

August 14, 2016

health @ Savannah

GNU Health 3.0.3 patchset released

Dear community

GNU Health 3.0.3 patchset has been released !

Priority: Medium

Table of Contents

  • About GNU Health Patchsets
  • Updating your system with the GNU Health control Center
  • Installation notes
  • List of issues related to this patchset

About GNU Health Patchsets

We provide "patchsets" to stable releases. Patchsets allow applying bug fixes and updates on production systems. Always try to keep your production system up-to-date with the latest patches.

Patches and Patchsets maximize uptime for production systems, and keep your system updated, without the need to do a whole installation.

For more information about GNU Health patches and patchsets you can visit https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/GNU_Health/Patches_and_Patchsets

NOTE: Patchsets are applied on previously installed systems only. For new, fresh installations, download and install the whole tarball (ie, gnuhealth-3.0.3.tar.gz)

Updating your system with the GNU Health control Center

Starting GNU Health 3.x series, you can do automatic updates on the GNU Health and Tryton kernel and modules using the GNU Health control center program.

Please refer to the administration manual section ( https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/GNU_Health/Control_Center )

The GNU Health control center works on standard installations (those done following the installation manual on wikibooks). Don't use it if you use an alternative method or if your distribution does not follow the GNU Health packaging guidelines.

Summary of this patchset

  • Fix issues when updating demographics on existing person

Refer to the List of issues related to this patchset for a comprehensive list of fixed bugs.

Installation Notes

You must apply previous patchsets before installing this patchset. If your patchset level is 3.0.2, then just follow the general instructions. You can find the patchsets at GNU Health FTP site (ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/health/)

Follow the general instructions at

List of issues related to this patchset

health core: bug #48695: Error when adding attribute in existing person

For detailed information about each issue, you can visit https://savannah.gnu.org/bugs/?group=health

by Luis Falcon at August 14, 2016 02:55 PM

August 11, 2016

FSF News

Free Software Foundation releases FY2015 Annual Report

The report is available in low-resolution (2.4 MB PDF) and high-resolution (30.7 MB PDF).

The Annual Report reviews the Foundation's activities, accomplishments, and financial picture. The report examines the impact of the FSF's programs, and FY2015's major events, including LibrePlanet and our thirtieth anniversary.

As with all of the Foundation's activities, the Annual Report was made exclusively using free software, including Scribus, GIMP, Inkscape, and LibreOffice, along with freely licensed fonts and images. The report is released under a CC BY SA 4.0 license.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x 17
campaigns@fsf.org

August 11, 2016 10:28 PM

FSF Blogs

Software Should Be Free: The FSF's first Annual Report

Now we are publishing our first Annual Report, which covers the 2015 fiscal year of October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015. The report offers a look at the Foundation's activities, accomplishments, and financial picture. You will also read about the impact of our programs and FY2015's major events, including LibrePlanet and our thirtieth anniversary. A high resolution version is also available.

You can support the FSF's fight for user freedom by:

This report is a snapshot of the FSF's work, and we hope you will continue with us for the next thirty years. Please send any questions or comments regarding the report to campaigns@fsf.org.

August 11, 2016 09:35 PM

hyperbole @ Savannah

GNU Hyperbole 6.0.2 for Emacs 24.4 or newer is released

For information on what GNU Hyperbole is, screenshots, download and
installation instructions, see the GNU Hyperbole home page:

https://www.gnu.org/software/hyperbole

The Hyperbole wiki page:

https://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/Hyperbole

explains the many ways it differs from and is complementary to Org mode.

Hyperbole includes an interactive demo to introduce you to its features and a
detailed reference manual.

========================================================
What's New in GNU Hyperbole V6.0.2
========================================================

BUTTONS

- pathname Implicit Button Type: generalized to handle hash-style links to
HTML files, to Github Markdown # sections and to Emacs outline *
sections. So an Action Key press on any of the following links displays
the link referent:
"man/hyperbole.html#Questions-and-Answers"
"README.md#why-was-hyperbole-developed"
"DEMO#HTML Markdown and Emacs Outline Hash Links"
Even links split across 2 lines like this now work: "DEMO#Social Media
Hashtags and Usernames", as long as point is on the first line.

Within HTML and Markdown files, in-file hash links without any file name
prefix work as well.

HTML hash-links are case-sensitive; other hash-links are not. Hash links
typically use dashes in place of the spaces that referents may contain,
but if the link is enclosed in quotes, Hyperbole allows spaces to be used
as well. In fact, it is best practice to always enclose hash-style links
in quotes so Hyperbole can distinguish them from other similar looking
constructs, such as social media hashtags (see "(hyperbole)Social Media").

Pathnames surrounded by literal non-ASCII quote marks now work as well.
For example, ‘http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/hyperbole/’.

- New Implicit Button Type, markdown-internal-link, displays any in-file
Markdown link referent, aside from pathnames and urls. Together with
other types, all Markdown links can now be followed by the Action Key.

- social-reference Implicit Button Type: Disabled this type within quoted
strings (all modes) and within parentheses (markdown-mode), so in-file
hash link references are not matched as social hash tags. Made the list
of modes a variable, hibtypes-social-inhibit-modes.

- New link-to-web-search Action Type: Allows global and explicit buttons
to link to specific web term searches from `hyperbole-web-search-alist'.

- org-mode Implicit Button Type: Improved to invoke org-meta-return when
not on an Org link or outline heading.

DOCUMENTATION

- Added pointer to HyControl video and {C-c \} binding which invokes
HyControl window control.

- README File: New Org-mode user testimonial.

- DEMO File: Added description and exercise using the new Find/Web menu.

- Added README.md.html introduction with images combining README, INSTALL
and HY-ABOUT information.

- Full set of hand-written changes are now in the file "Changes". The
former name, ChangeLog, is now auto-generated from the version controlled
'git log' but not as complete.

KEYS

- New variables, action-key-eol-function and assist-key-eol-function, used
to control what the Action and Assist Keys do at the end of a line.
Default behaviors remain as before but now one can set these to do
something other than scrolling, if desired. See "(hyperbole)Smart Key -
Smart Scrolling"

- When in HyControl, pressing {ESC} now quits in addition to {q}.

MENUS

- New submenu, Find/Web, for quick access to major web search engines.
The Find/Web menu looks like this:
Web> Amazon Bing Dictionary Elisp Facebook Google Hub(git) Images Maps RFCs StackOverflow Twitter Wikipedia Youtube

Hyperbole binds the key {C-c /} for quick access to this menu, if it is
not already bound prior to Hyperbole's initialization. The
Cust/Web-Search menu, {C-h h c w}, sets the option,
hyperbole-web-search-browser-function, which determines whether web
search results are displayed within Emacs or with an external web
browser. A short video introduction to the Find/Web menu may be found at
https://youtu.be/8lMlJed0-OM.

Advanced users can change the search engines listed in the Find/Web menu
with M-x customize-variable RET hyperbole-web-search-alist RET. Changes
are automatically reflected in the Hyperbole menus once applied.
Remember each search engine name must begin with a unique letter and each
URL must have a %s format field indicating where to place the web search
term when a search is performed. See "(hyperbole)Web Search Engines".

-- The End --

by Robert Weiner at August 11, 2016 02:02 AM

August 10, 2016

FSF Blogs

Support the Libre Tea Computer Card, a candidate for Respects Your Freedom certification

They write:

"Now imagine if you owned a computing device that you could easily fix yourself and inexpensively upgrade as needed. So, instead of having to shell out for a completely new computer, you could simply spend around US$50 to upgrade — which, by the way, you could easily do in SECONDS, by pushing a button on the side of your device and just popping in a new computer card. Doesn’t that sound like the way it should be?"

This project certainly sounds appealing, but only if the computer hardware is designed and configured to run software that does as much as possible to respect your freedom and ensure your control over your device. Fortunately, one option you have when backing this project is to purchase a Libre Tea Computer Card. After working closely with the developers and reviewing a sample test board, we are confident that their plans are to create a device that can achieve our Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification. And because the project is running their crowdfunding on Crowd Supply, users can financially support them anonymously and without the use of proprietary Javascript.

The project is being developed by Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton of Rhombus-Tech and is sponsored by Christopher Waid of ThinkPenguin, a company that sells multiple RYF-certified hardware products. It is exciting to see passionate free software advocates in our community working with OEMs to produce a computer hardware product capable of achieving RYF certification. We hope that this is the first of many computing systems they are able to design and build that respect your freedom.

The Libre Tea Computer Card is built with an Allwinner A20 dual core processor configured to use the main CPU for graphics; it has 2 GB of RAM and 8 GB of NAND Flash; and it will come pre-installed with Parabola GNU/Linux-libre, an FSF-endorsed fully-free operating system.

We encourage you to back the Libre Tea Computer Card. We'll have to do another evaluation once it is actually produced to be sure it meets our certification standards, but we have high hopes. Their funding deadline is August 26th, so don't delay!

August 10, 2016 09:20 PM

August 09, 2016

dico @ Savannah

Version 2.3

Version 2.3 is available for download from the Main GNU site as well as from its home. Mirrors worldwide are also available.

New in this version:

  • IPv6 support
  • Guile 2.x support
  • New matching strategy: metaphone2 (Double Metaphone phonetic encoding algorithm).
  • Implement info and description for gcide dictionary
  • Fixed bugs in idxgcide
  • Added manpages

by Sergey Poznyakoff at August 09, 2016 12:00 PM

GNUtls

GnuTLS 3.5.3

Released GnuTLS 3.5.3, a minor enhancement and bug fix release in next stable branch.

by Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos (nmav@gnutls.org) at August 09, 2016 12:00 AM

August 08, 2016

FSF Blogs

Licensing resource series: h-node hardware directory

While our Respects Your Freedom hardware certification program gets lots of attention from all the new fully free hardware being certified, the FSF has actually had more resources on hardware for quite some time. In the past, we maintained a list of hardware that worked well with free software. But a few years back we made this into a community run project, h-node.

Hardware listed on h-node doesn't come with FSF certification, but it does come with the information users need to find out the extent to which the hardware is supported by fully free GNU/Linux distros. Members of the community can submit entries to h-node whenever they get a chance to test it against one of these free operating systems. By sharing this information, everyone can help more users to make the switch to a fully free system by making it easier to know what hardware already works perfectly with a free system. Hackers looking to help increase support can also find hardware with some remaining issues and direct their efforts there.

The directory covers a wide breadth of hardware, from basic components like video cards to full laptops or towers, even peripherals like printers and webcams. So whether you're looking to upgrade a current computer, or buying a new one, h-node is a good resource to check before spending your money. The directory even has information on devices released quite long ago, so it can be useful for helping you decide how to re-purpose older hardware. It of course also covers recently released hardware, but it is only as up to date as its most recent contributor makes it. As stated before, h-node is a resource built by the community, so it depends on users like you stepping up to help out. Here's how you can help:

  • Create an account on h-node.org to test and add your own hardware to the directory. Or you can suggest features/bugfixes for the site itself.

  • You can keep up to date on this series and more free software news by subscribing to our newsletter, the Free Software Supporter and subscribing to our RSS feed.

  • You can help fund our work in creating these licensing resources by becoming a member or by making a donation.

Enjoy this article? Check out our previous entry on A Quick Guide to the GPLv3

August 08, 2016 06:22 PM

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 12th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, August 12th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

August 08, 2016 06:22 PM

diffutils @ Savannah

diffutils-3.4 released [stable]

by Jim Meyering at August 08, 2016 06:10 PM

August 05, 2016

libc @ Savannah

The GNU C Library version 2.24 is now available

The GNU C Library
=================

The GNU C Library version 2.24 is now available.

The GNU C Library is used as the C library in the GNU system and
in GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux
as the kernel.

The GNU C Library is primarily designed to be a portable
and high performance C library. It follows all relevant
standards including ISO C11 and POSIX.1-2008. It is also
internationalized and has one of the most complete
internationalization interfaces known.

The GNU C Library webpage is at http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/

Packages for the 2.24 release may be downloaded from:
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/libc/
http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/libc/

The mirror list is at http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html

NEWS for version 2.24
=====================

  • The minimum Linux kernel version that this version of the GNU C Library

can be used with is 3.2, except on i[4567]86 and x86_64, where Linux
kernel version 2.6.32 or later suffices (on architectures that already
required kernel versions more recent than 3.2, those requirements remain
unchanged). Linux 3.2 or later kernel headers are required on all
architectures.

  • The pap_AN locale has been deleted. This has been deprecated for a long

time. It has been replaced by pap_AW & pap_CW, both of which have long
been included in previous releases.

  • The readdir_r and readdir64_r functions have been deprecated. It is

recommended to use readdir and readdir64 instead.

  • The type “union wait” has been removed. It was deprecated in the early

1990s and never part of POSIX. Application code should use the int type
instead of “union wait”.

  • A new NSS action is added to facilitate large distributed system

administration. The action, MERGE, allows remote user stores like LDAP
to be merged into local user stores like /etc/groups in order to provide
easy to use, updated, and managed sets of merged credentials. The new
action can be used by configuring it in /etc/nsswitch.conf:
group: files [SUCCESS=merge] nis
Implemented by Stephen Gallagher (Red Hat).

  • The deprecated __malloc_initialize_hook variable has been removed from the

API.

  • The long unused localedef --old-style option has been removed. It hasn't

done anything in over 16 years. Scripts using this option can safely
drop it.

  • nextupl, nextup, nextupf, nextdownl, nextdown and nextdownf are added to

libm. They are defined by TS 18661 and IEEE754-2008. The nextup functions
return the next representable value in the direction of positive infinity
and the nextdown functions return the next representable value in the
direction of negative infinity. These are currently enabled as GNU
extensions.

Security related changes:

  • An unnecessary stack copy in _nss_dns_getnetbyname_r was removed. It

could result in a stack overflow when getnetbyname was called with an
overly long name. (CVE-2016-3075)

  • Previously, getaddrinfo copied large amounts of address data to the stack,

even after the fix for CVE-2013-4458 has been applied, potentially
resulting in a stack overflow. getaddrinfo now uses a heap allocation
instead. Reported by Michael Petlan. (CVE-2016-3706)

  • The glob function suffered from a stack-based buffer overflow when it was

called with the GLOB_ALTDIRFUNC flag and encountered a long file name.
Reported by Alexander Cherepanov. (CVE-2016-1234)

  • The Sun RPC UDP client could exhaust all available stack space when

flooded with crafted ICMP and UDP messages. Reported by Aldy Hernandez'
alloca plugin for GCC. (CVE-2016-4429)

  • The IPv6 name server management code in libresolv could result in a memory

leak for each thread which is created, performs a failing naming lookup,
and exits. Over time, this could result in a denial of service due to
memory exhaustion. Reported by Matthias Schiffer. (CVE-2016-5417)

The following bugs are resolved with this release:

[1170] localedata: ne_NP: update Nepali locale definition file
[3629] manual: stpcpy description in string.texi refers to MS-DOG instead
of MS-DOS.
[6527] malloc: [powerpc] Malloc alignment insufficient for PowerPC
[6796] math: fdim() does not set errno on overflow
[10354] libc: posix_spawn should use vfork() in more cases than presently
[11213] localedata: localedata: add copyright disclaimer to locale files
[12143] localedata: chr_US: new Cherokee locale
[12450] localedata: sgs_LT: new locale
[12676] localedata: ln_CD: new locale
[13237] localedata: LC_ADDRESS.country_name: update all locales w/latest
CLDR data
[13304] math: fma, fmaf, fmal produce wrong results
[14259] build: --localedir arg to configure is ignored
[14499] nptl: Does posix_spawn invoke atfork handlers / use vfork?
[14750] libc: Race condition in posix_spawn vfork usage vs signal handlers
[14934] localedata: es_CL: wrong first weekday chilean locale
[15262] localedata: LC_MESSAGES.yesexpr/noexpr: inconsistent use of
romanisation
[15263] localedata: LC_MESSAGES.yesexpr/noexpr: inconsistent use of 1/0
and +/-
[15264] localedata: LC_MESSAGES.yesstr/nostr: lacking in many locales
[15368] nptl: raise() is not async-signal-safe
[15479] math: ceil, floor, round and trunc raise inexact exception
[15578] localedata: kk_KZ: various updates
[16003] localedata: pap_AN: punt old locale
[16137] localedata: iw_IL: punt old locale
[16190] localedata: eo: new esperanto locale
[16374] localedata: lv_LV: change currency symbol in LC_MONETARY to euro
[16742] malloc: race condition: pthread_atfork() called before first
malloc() results in unexpected locking behaviour/deadlocks
[16975] localedata: LC_MESSAGES.yesexpr/noexpr: revisit capitalization in
all locales
[16983] localedata: postal_fmt does not allow %l and %n modifiers
[17565] localedata: pt_PT: wrong (work-)week start
[17899] math: [powerpc] floorl returns negative zero with FE_DOWNWARD
[17950] build: Build fails with -msse
[18205] localedata: be_BY*: wrong first_weekday and first_workday
[18433] libc: posix_spawn does not return correctly upon failure to
execute
[18453] localedata: charmaps/IBM875: incorrect codes
[18712] string: bits/string2.h incompatible with -O2 -Werror=packed
-Wsystem-headers
[18896] localedata: he_IL: improvements for currency
[18911] localedata: ro_RO: Correcting week day name for "Tuesday" in
Romanian locale data
[18960] locale: s390: _nl_locale_subfreeres uses larl opcode on misaligned
symbol
[19056] libc: Deprecate readdir_r
[19133] localedata: pt_*: days & months should be lowercase in Portuguese
language
[19198] localedata: nl_NL: small improvements for Dutch locales
[19257] network: Per-thread memory leak in __res_vinit with IPv6
nameservers (CVE-2016-5417)
[19269] build: tst-audit4 and tst-audit10 failures with gcc-6 on non avx
machine
[19400] locale: Language missing in "iso-639.def", trivial fix in
description
[19431] malloc: Deadlock between fflush, getdelim, and fork
[19505] libc: Incorrect file descriptor validity checks in
posix_spawn_file_actions_add{open,close,dup2}
[19509] dynamic-link: dlsym, dlvsym do not report errors through dlerror
when using RTLD_NEXT
[19512] locale: Stale `#ifndef HAVE_BUILTIN_EXPECT' in
`intl/{gettextP,loadinfo}.h'
[19534] libc: execle, execlp may use malloc
[19568] localedata: *_CH: Swiss locales have inconsistent start of week
[19573] network: res_nclose and __res_maybe_init disagree about name
server initialization, breaking Hesiod
[19575] localedata: Status of GB18030 tables
[19581] localedata: sr_* date_fmt string contains additional newline
[19583] string: SSSE3_Fast_Copy_Backward flag needs to be enabled for AMD
Excavator core
[19592] math: [ldbl-128ibm] ceill incorrect in non-default rounding modes
[19593] math: [ldbl-128ibm] truncl incorrect in non-default rounding modes
[19594] math: [ldbl-128ibm] roundl incorrect in non-default rounding modes
[19595] math: [ldbl-128ibm] fmodl incorrect for results in subnormal
double range
[19602] math: [ldbl-128ibm] fmodl handling of equal arguments with low
part zero incorrect
[19603] math: [ldbl-128ibm] remainderl, remquol incorrect sign handling in
equality tests
[19610] dynamic-link: ldconfig -X removes stale symbolic links
[19613] libc: s390x (64 bit) macro expansion WCOREDUMP and others
[19633] locale: strfmon_l applies global locale to number formatting
[19642] network: Memory leak in getnameinfo
[19648] libc: test-skeleton.c: Do not set RLIMIT_DATA
[19653] libc: Potential for NULL pointer dereference (CWE-476) in
glibc-2.22
[19654] math: [x86_64] Need testcase for BZ #19590 fix
[19671] localedata: Missing Sanity Check for malloc() in 'tst-fmon.c' &
'tst-numeric.c'
[19674] math: [ldbl-128ibm] powl incorrect overflow handling
[19677] math: [ldbl-128ibm] remainderl equality test incorrect for zero
low part
[19678] math: [ldbl-128ibm] nextafterl, nexttowardl incorrect sign of zero
result
[19679] dynamic-link: gcc-4.9.3 C++ exception handling broken due to
unaligned stack
[19726] locale: Converting UCS4LE to INTERNAL with iconv() does not update
pointers and lengths in error-case.
[19727] locale: Converting from/to UTF-xx with iconv() does not always
report errors on UTF-16 surrogates values.
[19755] nscd: nscd assertion failure in gc
[19758] dynamic-link: Typo in EXTRA_LD_ENVVARS for x86-64
[19759] libc: mempcpy shouldn't be inlined
[19762] dynamic-link: HAS_CPU_FEATURE/HAS_ARCH_FEATURE are easy to misuse
[19765] libc: s390 needs an optimized mempcpy
[19779] glob: glob: buffer overflow with GLOB_ALTDIRFUNC due to incorrect
NAME_MAX limit assumption (CVE-2016-1234)
[19783] build: benchtests don't support --enable-hardcoded-path-in-tests
[19787] network: Missing and incorrect truncation checks in getnameinfo
[19790] math: [ldbl-128ibm] nearbyintl incorrect in non-default rounding
modes
[19791] network: Assertion failure in res_query.c with un-connectable name
server addresses
[19792] libc: MIPS: backtrace yields infinite backtrace with makecontext
[19822] math: libm.so install clobbers old version
[19825] network: resolv: send_vc can return uninitialized data in second
response to getaddrinfo
[19830] network: nss_dns: should check RDATA length against buffer length
[19831] network: nss_dns: getaddrinfo returns uninitialized data when
confronted with A/AAAA records of invalid size
[19837] nss: nss_db: No retries for some long lines with a larger buffer
[19848] math: powl(10,n) for n=-4,-5,-6,-7 is off by more than 1 ULP
[19853] stdio: Printing IBM long double in decimal with high precision is
sometimes incorrect
[19860] build: x86_64: compile errors for tst-audit10 and tst-auditmod10b
[19861] nptl: libpthread IFUNC resolver for fork can lead to crash
[19862] network: resolv, nss_dns: Remove remaining logging of unexpected
record types
[19865] network: Assertion failure or memory leak in
_nss_dns_getcanonname_r
[19868] network: nss_dns: netent code does not skip over non-PTR records
[19879] network: nss_dns: Stack overflow in getnetbyname implementation
(CVE-2016-3075)
[19881] string: Improve x86-64 memset
[19907] string: Incorrect memcpy tests
[19916] dynamic-link: S390: fprs/vrs are not saved/restored while
resolving symbols
[19925] libc: termios.h XCASE namespace
[19928] string: memmove-vec-unaligned-erms.S is slow with large data size
[19929] libc: limits.h NL_NMAX namespace
[19931] stdio: Memory leak in vfprintf
[19957] libc: clone(CLONE_VM) access invalid parent memory
[19963] localedata: en_IL: New locale
[19989] stdio: stdio.h cuserid namespace
[19994] network: getaddrinfo does not restore RES_USE_INET6 flag in
gethosts
[19996] locale: langinfo.h nl_langinfo_l namespace
[20005] stdio: fflush on a file opened with fmemopen resets position to 0
[20010] network: getaddrinfo: Stack overflow in hostent translation
(CVE-2016-3706)
[20012] stdio: libio: fmemopen append mode failure
[20014] stdio: stdio.h namespace for pre-threads POSIX
[20017] network: resolv: Use gmtime_r instead of gmtime in p_secstodate
[20023] libc: fcntl.h timespec namespace
[20024] math: [x86_64] vectorized sincos trashes the stack
[20031] network: nss_hesiod: Heap overflow in get_txt_records
[20041] time: sys/time.h timespec namespace
[20043] libc: unistd.h missing cuserid for UNIX98 and before
[20044] libc: unistd.h missing pthread_atfork for UNIX98
[20051] libc: ttyslot in wrong header under wrong conditions
[20054] libc: gethostname not declared for XPG4
[20055] libc: termios.h missing tcgetsid for XPG4
[20072] dynamic-link: x86 init_cpu_features is called twice in static
executable
[20073] libc: sys/stat.h fchmod namespace
[20074] libc: stdlib.h rand_r namespace
[20076] libc: sys/stat.h missing S_IFSOCK, S_ISSOCK for XPG4
[20094] libc: stdlib.h should not declare grantpt, ptsname, unlockpt for
XPG3
[20111] libc: struct sockaddr_storage cannot be aggregate-copied
[20112] network: sunrpc: stack (frame) overflow in Sun RPC clntudp_call
(CVE-2016-4429)
[20115] string: Extra alignment in memset-vec-unaligned-erms.S
[20119] libc: Wrong mask for processors level type from CPUID
[20139] dynamic-link: Upper part of zmm is zeroed if Glibc is built with
AS not supporting AVX512
[20151] math: [ldbl-128/ldbl-128ibm] j0l, j1l, y0l, y1l return sNaN for
sNaN argument
[20153] math: [ldbl-128ibm] sqrtl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20156] math: [ldbl-128ibm] ceill, rintl etc. return sNaN for sNaN
argument
[20157] math: [powerpc] fabsl (sNaN) wrongly raises "invalid"
[20160] math: [powerpc] ceil, rint etc. return sNaN for sNaN input
[20178] libc: posix_spawn{p} should not call exit
[20191] stdio: libio: vtables hardening
[20195] string: FMA4 detection requires CPUID execution with register
eax=0x80000001
[20198] libc: quick_exit incorrectly destroys C++11 thread objects.
[20205] math: [i386/x86_64] nextafterl incorrect incrementing negative
subnormals
[20212] math: acos (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20213] math: asin (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20214] network: Linux header sync with linux/in6.h and ipv6.h again.
[20218] math: [i386] asinhl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20219] math: [i386] atanhl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20222] stdio: fopencookie: Mangle function pointers
[20224] math: [i386] cbrtl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20225] math: ldexp, scalbn, scalbln return sNaN for sNaN input
[20226] math: [i386/x86_64] expl, exp10l, expm1l return sNaN for sNaN
input
[20227] math: [i386/x86_64] logl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20228] math: [i386/x86_64] log10l (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20229] math: [i386/x86_64] log1pl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20232] math: [ldbl-128] expm1l (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20233] math: [ldbl-128ibm] expm1l (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20234] math: [ldbl-128ibm] log1pl (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20235] math: [i386/x86_64] log2l (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20237] nss: nss_db: getent segfaults without preceding setent
[20240] math: modf (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20248] libc: debug/tst-longjump_chk2 calls printf from a signal handler
[20250] math: frexp (sNaN) returns sNaN
[20252] math: atan2 (sNaN, qNaN) fails to raise "invalid"
[20255] math: [i386] fdim, fdimf return with excess range and precision /
double rounding
[20256] math: [i386/x86_64] fdiml returns sNaN for sNaN input
[20260] string: ../sysdeps/x86/bits/string.h:1092:3: error: array
subscript is below array bounds [-Werror=array-bounds]
[20262] nis: _nss_nis_initgroups_dyn always returns NSS_STATUS_NOTFOUND
[20263] nptl: robust mutex deadlocks if other thread requests timedlock
(Only arm/linux)
[20277] libc: $dp is not initialized correctly in sysdeps/hppa/start.S
[20284] malloc: malloc: Corrupt arena avoidance causes unnecessary mmap
fallbacks
[20296] math: [i386/x86_64] scalbl returns sNaN for sNaN input, missing
"invalid" exceptions
[20314] nptl: make[4]: *** [/usr/include/stdlib.h] Error 1
[20316] localedata: id_ID: Februari instead of Pebruari
[20327] string: POWER8 strcasecmp returns incorrect result
[20347] math: Failure: Test: j0_downward (0xap+0)
[20348] libc: FAIL: misc/tst-preadvwritev64
[20349] libc: 64-bit value is passed differently in p{readv,writev}{64}
[20350] libc: There is no test for p{read,write}64
[20357] math: Incorrect cos result for 1.5174239687223976
[20384] build: Don't run libmvec-sincos-avx* tests on non avx machines

Contributors
============

This release was made possible by the contributions of many people.
The maintainers are grateful to everyone who has contributed
changes or bug reports. These include:

Adhemerval Zanella
Andreas Schwab
Andrew Senkevich
Anton Blanchard
Arnas Udovičius
Aurelien Jarno
Carlos Eduardo Seo
Carlos O'Donell
Chris Metcalf
Chung-Lin Tang
Claude Paroz
Dimitris Pappas
Dmitry V. Levin
Dylan Alex Simon
Eduardo Trápani
Florian Weimer
Gabriel F. T. Gomes
Gunnar Hjalmarsson
Gustavo Romero
Guy Rutenberg
H.J. Lu
Hongjiu Zhang
Jiyoung Yun
John David Anglin
Joseph Myers
Khem Raj
Maciej W. Rozycki
Mark Wielaard
Marko Myllynen
Martin Galvan
Matthew Fortune
Matthias Wallnoefer
Mike FABIAN
Mike Frysinger
Neskie Manuel
Nick Alcock
Paras pradhan
Paul E. Murphy
Paul Pluzhnikov
Rajalakshmi Srinivasaraghavan
Rical Jasan
Richard Henderson
Robin van der Vliet
Roland McGrath
Samuel Thibault
Siddhesh Poyarekar
Simion Onea
Stefan Liebler
Stephen Gallagher
Szabolcs Nagy
Timur Birsh
Torvald Riegel
Tulio Magno Quites Machado Filho
Wilco Dijkstra
Will Newton
Yvan Roux
Zack Weinberg

by Carlos O'Donell at August 05, 2016 04:12 PM

August 04, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 5th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, August 15th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

August 04, 2016 02:24 PM

August 03, 2016

guix @ Savannah

GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.11.0 released

It is a pleasure to announce the new beta release of GNU Guix and GuixSD, version 0.11.0!

The release comes with USB installation images to install the standalone GuixSD, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries.

It’s been 4 months since the previous release, during which 70 people contributed code and packages. The highlights include:

See https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/guix-devel/2016-08/msg00219.html for details.

About GNU Guix

GNU Guix is a transactional package manager for the GNU system. The Guix System Distribution or GuixSD is an advanced distribution of the GNU system that relies on GNU Guix and respects the user's freedom.

In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, except that packages are defined as native Guile modules, using extensions to the Scheme language. GuixSD offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management, and is highly customizable and hackable.

GuixSD can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el and armv7.

by Ludovic Courtès at August 03, 2016 02:23 PM