Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

December 07, 2016

grep @ Savannah

grep-2.27 released [stable]

by Jim Meyering at December 07, 2016 07:42 AM

December 06, 2016

GNU Remotecontrol

Newsletter – December 2016

THIS MONTH…..

  • TRENDS
  • EYE CATCHING
  • DISCUSSIONS
  • WORK PACKAGE PHASES
  • PROJECT NEEDS
  • EXISTING CODE
  • LASTLY
TRENDS

United States Electricity Price per KWH
Present and Past

EYE CATCHING

Demand Response
Google Home is expected to overtake Amazon’s Smart Echo by 2020. A review of Google Home found almost as many positive features as negative. The expected United Kingdom release date for the offering is November 2016. An article recently asserted the need for high-speed Internet to accomplish integrating the Smart Grid, as Smart Grid development lags behind in rural areas. The FERC said they, “are taking a more “open” avenue instead of a piecemeal approach” for deciding market power matters regarding the buying and selling of electricity. Nest is operating a field test of fifty-thousand thermostats running concurrently. Austin, Texas now requires Smart Thermostats in all new home construction. The requirement does not clearly distinguish homeowner rights. Note the language contained in the ordinance on page four, section C403.2.18 and page five, section C405.2.6. The text of this ordinance passes all security responsibility to the OpenADR protocol.

The race to bring the residential premises into the Smart Grid is accelerating. The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a developing technology standard for enabling simple devices to communicate with the Internet. It is likely CoAP will intersect with existing security protocols soon. It is unclear how security will be handled by CoAP. The opportunity cost to build the Smart Grid without clearly defined technology standards embracing adequate network security is a high price for any nation to pay. The cost is the expense of the residential premises. A single security incident would vacate much forward momentum of Smart Grid integration. The Austin mandate to not only require residential construction to allow access into the home by the electrical utility but also mandate control is clear evidence of how much force is being applied to bring the residential premises into the Smart Grid.

Smart Grid – Security
A vulnerability existing for over a decade in OpenSSH has led to today’s Internet of Things devices being used in targeted attacks. The reason is the devices are not being updated with the latest version of software. A recent study of taking the residential premises connected to the Smart Grid and using it as a weapon to harm the Internet was presented. The findings show bringing the Internet to a slower transfer rate is not only possible but has occurred.

The connectivity of a device to the Internet is neither good nor bad. It is a risk which must be managed. The risk is soon to be regulated by more examples of the Austin requirements, as previously stated.

DISCUSSIONS

Firmware
GNU remotecontrol shared earlier this year we have entered the firmware aspect of the residential network connected HVAC thermostat (smart) thermostat. We are in the process of selecting a kernel distribution. The research is going slow, but the work is progressing. An outcome of our efforts so far has highlighted the need to structure the many inquiries and discussions about establishing strategic partnerships with GNU remotecontrol and the need to also establish technology alliances.

Partnerships and Alliances
GNU remotecontrol is at the point of leveraging for-profit organizations to establish both strategic partnerships and technology alliances. The discussions have shown us there are two barriers to the economic side of our growth plan as a software project. First, the financial versus technological relationship. Second, the small amount of system thinking on the part of our applicants. The findings clearly demonstrate the inability to achieve conceptual thinking by establishing productive agreements.

The goal of a for-profit organization to prioritize the financial aspect of the relationship is fair but suffers the ability to come to an agreement when the financial aspect is the dominant factor in the negotiations. The goal of not wanting to be a part of system thinking is not fair, as the software project is a system. The insufficient amount of conceptual thinking on the part of many applicants seeking to form either a partnership or an alliance with GNU remotecontrol requires us to refine our application process further. GNU remotecontrol must gain a more concise understanding during early discussions of applicant’s goals and objectives in their desire to form either a partnership or an alliance with GNU remotecontrol. This understanding will help reduce our time spent in discussions with applicants who are not a productive match for the software project.

WORK PACKAGE PHASES

GNU remotecontrol accomplishes productive work output through structured work packages. This approach helps to organize our efforts and keep things on track to achieve publishing our work. We have ten different phases for our work packages.

GNU remotecontrol Work Package Phases

Order Label Name
1 REQ Requirements
2 DSG Design
3 DEV Development
4 UNT Unit Testing
5 SYS System Testing
6 UAT User Acceptance Testing
7 DOC Documentation
8 RLS Release
9 TRN Training
10 SPT Support

The GNU remotecontrol team does not perform any work output outside of structured work packages.

PROJECT NEEDS

Staffing
GNU remotecontrol Project Help Wanted

https://savannah.gnu.org/people/?group=remotecontrol

New Thermostats
Many people have asked us about adding other types of thermostats to GNU remotecontrol. There are three questions that need to be answered before we can offer GNU remotecontrol support for any IP thermostat. These questions are:

  • How to CONNECT to it (NETWORK).
  • How to READ from it (CODE).
  • How to WRITE to it (CODE).

It is our hope to have dozens and dozens of thermostat types that work with GNU remotecontrol.

EXISTING CODE

Bugs
We have 0 new bugs and 0 fixed bugs since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

Tasks
We have 0 new tasks and 0 completed tasks since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

LASTLY

Whatever you do…..don’t get beat up over your Energy Management strategy. GNU remotecontrol is here to help simplify your life, not make it more complicated. Talk to us if you are stuck or cannot figure out the best option for your GNU remotecontrol framework. The chances are the answer you need is something we have already worked through. We would be happy to help you by discussing your situation with you.

…..UNTIL NEXT MONTH!

Why the Affero GPL?

GNU Affero General Public License LOGO

GNU remotecontrol LOGO


by gnuremotecontrol at December 06, 2016 06:27 PM

December 04, 2016

administration @ Savannah

The git service has moved to the new server

The git service has been moved onto the new server. All should be working normally but at the new IP address of the new server. The new server includes improved cryptography protocols and security.

Yesterday this was moved and then rolled back due to a regression. That has been fixed now. Sorry for the disruption.

by Bob Proulx at December 04, 2016 12:38 AM

December 02, 2016

FSF Blogs

Seventeen new GNU releases in November

For announcements of most new GNU releases, subscribe to the info-gnu mailing list: https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/info-gnu.

To download: nearly all GNU software is available from https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/, or preferably one of its mirrors from https://www.gnu.org/prep/ftp.html. You can use the url https://ftpmirror.gnu.org/ to be automatically redirected to a (hopefully) nearby and up-to-date mirror.

This month, we welcome Mathieu Lirzin as the new maintainer of GNU Freetalk.

A number of GNU packages, as well as the GNU operating system as a whole, are looking for maintainers and other assistance: please see https://www.gnu.org/server/takeaction.html#unmaint if you'd like to help. The general page on how to help GNU is at https://www.gnu.org/help/help.html.

If you have a working or partly working program that you'd like to offer to the GNU project as a GNU package, see https://www.gnu.org/help/evaluation.html.

As always, please feel free to write to us at maintainers@gnu.org with any GNUish questions or suggestions for future installments.

December 02, 2016 05:38 PM

gnuzilla @ Savannah

IceCat 45.5.1 release

GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0.
https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/

The user manual pages are at http://libreplanet.org/wiki/Group:IceCat/
You can contribute by joining the wiki and editing the manuals.

Source tarballs, binaries for generic GNU/Linux systems and translations are available at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuzilla/45.5.1/
GPG key ID:D7E04784 GNU IceCat releases
Fingerprint: A573 69A8 BABC 2542 B5A0 368C 3C76 EED7 D7E0 4784
https://savannah.gnu.org/project/memberlist-gpgkeys.php?group=gnuzilla

This release introduces few changes aside of the major upgrade from v38 to v45, which required changes to the branding, aboutIcecat pages,
spyblock, internationalization build system and search plugins.

Changes since v38.8.0ESR

  • Updated to v45.5.1ESR
  • https-everywhere updated to 5.2.7
  • Disabled antifeatures: EME, telemetry, flash, search suggestions, Geolocation, GMP, Pocket, and extension signatures. WebRTC tunned to prevent ip leaks over TOR.

by Ruben Rodriguez at December 02, 2016 01:23 AM

December 01, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friday New Beginnings Directory IRC meetup: December 2nd starting at 1 p.m. EST/18:00 UTC

Participate in supporting the FSD by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on irc.freenode.org.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the FSD contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, dto providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the FSD has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

This week's theme is new beginnings. With new volunteers joining us from last weeks meeting, and the fact that we haven't had a meeting focused on adding new entries to the directory, it's time to focus a bit on the new. We'll of course be discussing ongoing projects as well, but this week we want to make sure the directory keeps growing even as we do the work on the infrastructure needed to make it better.

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

December 01, 2016 04:49 PM

November 30, 2016

administration @ Savannah

Savannah is migrating to updated systems.

Savannah is in the process of being migrated to updated systems. Yay! After much effort the Savannah Hackers team is beginning a migration of the many components of Savannah. Savannah is going to be "under construction" for a brief time as services are moved.

The migration starts today, 2016-11-30, and will continue until completed. The migration will occur piecemeal in small service groups rather than all at once. Savannah is composed of many service groups. It will take some days and perhaps weeks to fully complete the migration of all services.

During this time users may notice hopefully brief service disruptions and may notice IP address changes while this migration is occurring. We will try to keep downtime to the minimum necessary. Watch this space for further status notices.

by Bob Proulx at November 30, 2016 11:56 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Pisa, Italy)

The Free Software Movement campaigns for computer users' freedom to cooperate and control their own computing. The Free Software Movement developed the GNU operating system, typically used together with the kernel Linux, specifically to make these freedoms possible.

This speech by Richard Stallman will be part of the “Ciclo di Conferenze Libertà digitali 2016 - Ingegneria Senza Frontiere.” It will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Location: Aula Magna Dini, Polo A di Ingegneria, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 2, 56126 Pisa, Italy

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Pisa.

November 30, 2016 09:40 PM

coreutils @ Savannah

coreutils-8.26 released [stable]

by Pádraig Brady at November 30, 2016 07:32 PM

FSF Blogs

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Micah Lee of GPG Sync

GPG Sync is a recently launched project for managing the sharing of GPG keys, particularly within an organization. Micah Lee made the project internally at First Look Media and has now shared it with the world.

What inspired the creation of GPG Sync?

Since the very beginning of First Look Media we've taken computer security seriously, and that includes every single employee using encrypted email. But as an organization that has over 100 employees at this point, most of whom aren't already computer nerds, I quickly realized that managing keys is too complicated of a task for every single person to be required to do. I use GPG Sync to solve this problem: all of the complexity of key management can be managed by a small group of techies, allowing our growing user base to use encrypted email without having to think about the details nearly as often.

How will people use it?

At First Look Media, we've installed GPG Sync on everyone's workstations and just let it run in the background, ensuring that everyone will have everyone else's public keys without having to think about it. But I think a lot of other organizations will find it useful as well. I've spoken with people who work for other news organizations, as well as the non-profit world, who are excited about implementing it internally there. And I'm personally going to subscribe to multiple GPG Sync fingerprints lists, so I'll have trustworthy public keys available for a much larger group of people.

What features do you think really sets GPG Sync apart from similar software?

GPG Sync is really focused on the needs of organizations, while most other email encryption-related software is focused on the needs of individuals.

Why did you choose the GPLv3 as GPG Sync's license?

Whenever I decide I want to release some code, I like to default to GNU GPL so I can lock it open. I'm not opposed to using permissive licenses like BSD or MIT, but I only use them if I think there's a compelling reason for them.

How can users (technical or otherwise) help contribute to GPG Sync?

First, start using it! If you're part of an organization where everyone uses encrypted email -- even if it's just the other people in your Dungeons and Dragons party -- try setting up a fingerprints list and have everyone use it. See what you think, and report any bugs, or suggest features you'd like to see, in the issue tracker. And if you have programming skills, please take a look at the issue tracker and make some pull requests. I'm always happy to merge other people's code into the project.

What's the next big thing for GPG Sync?

I'm not sure yet, but probably I will focus on a port to other platforms.

Enjoy this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series, featuring Stefano Zacchiroli of Software Heritage.

November 30, 2016 04:24 PM

November 2016: photos from Lisbon

RMS was in Lisbon, Portugal, this month to give a stand-alone speech, “Should We Have More Surveillance Than the USSR?”1, hosted by the Núcleo de Alunos de Ciência Política (the political-science students' group), at the Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE), on November 10th. FSF member and the event organizer Daniel Sousa underscored the advantage of being able to reach such a broad audience, especially in light of the how Portugal's “most recent governments have been taking measures that are quite Orwellian for fighting tax evasion”2:

(Photo under CC BY-SA 3.0 and courtesy of Diana Ramos.)

…and to take part in Web Summit (2016-11-07–10), a technology marketplace. RMS was one of the six hundred speakers and gave his speech “Reclaim Your Freedom with Free (Libre) Software” to an audience of about a thousand developers and engineers:

(Photo under CC BY-SA 3.0 and courtesy of Diana Ramos.)

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can inform you about future events in and around Lisbon. Please see www.fsf.org/events for a full list of all of RMS's confirmed engagements, and contact rms-assist@gnu.org if you'd like him to come speak.

Thank you to the Web Summit organizers and to Daniel Sousa for having made these appearances possible!


1. The recording of RMS's ISCTE speech will be available in our audio-video archive soon.
2. See example here (en.) and here (pt.).

November 30, 2016 03:44 PM

November 29, 2016

FSF Blogs

Join us as a member to give back for the free software you use

As software permeates more and more aspects of society, the FSF must expand our work to protect and extend computer user freedom. We launched our yearly fundraiser with the goal of welcoming 500 new members and raising $450,000 before December 31st. Please support the work at the root of the free software movement: make a donation or – better yet – join us and become a member today.

For the past year, we have been very busy upgrading our server infrastructure, which we wrote about in the Fall FSF Bulletin. The new stack of machines works fully on free software all the way down through the BIOS, and makes use of redundant network attached storage over 10Gbps Ethernet. Cool stuff! We take care to prevent issues with freedom and privacy on our machines, which means avoiding the current x86 server CPUs that are encumbered with back doors as well as other components that require the user to load nonfree firmware. We use a high-end ASUS KGPE D-16 server motherboard, supported by Libreboot. Despite being a few years old – and thus supporting CPUs without known back doors – it is a beefy piece of gear, running up to 32 CPU cores, 256GB of RAM, and many terabytes of Solid State Disk storage.

Making the extra effort to build a uniquely free server stack does not come without some hiccups. Although the motherboards work fine on their own – we are already using them to run lists.gnu.org and Savannah services – they do have rough edges that need to be polished, for example, to get reliable Peripheral Component Interconnect support. The setup of the new stack and migration of our services will require a sustained effort from our three-person tech team during 2017, which cannot happen successfully without your support.

By hosting most of the GNU Project, we enable development on free software components that are key for the whole computer industry, such as Emacs, Bash, and the utilities at the base of all the GNU/Linux distributions powering supercomputers and the Internet's servers. Our public FTP server, ftp.gnu.org, serves 100Mb per second of free software all day, every day. That is more than a terabyte! On top of that, lists.gnu.org and lists.nongnu.org spool out about a half million emails between free software developers and users each day!

We are excited to have the opportunity to benefit the community by building, testing, and perfecting new hardware and technology that doesn't just work, but also supports our freedoms. Our ability to provide dependable servers for the FSF and GNU Project comes from your generosity and commitment. Your support funds hardware and the time of free software experts to work on deployments. We need you to give back and support this root infrastructure, enabling future free software development and distribution to thrive.

P.S.: If you have not already submitted, the LibrePlanet Call For Papers is closing tomorrow, November 30th, 10:00 EST (15:00 UTC)!

November 29, 2016 10:48 PM

Licensing resource series: License Violations and Compliance

A big part of our work in the compliance lab revolves around license compliance. We handle compliance for many GNU Project packages, like GCC and GNU EMACS. When someone fails to meet the conditions of the GNU General Public License we help them to understand what is needed to be a good citizen in the free software community. But the nature of that work generally means that it all happens behind the scenes. We're not in the business of shaming those who need help with compliance, so when a compliance case arises there may never be any public statement about the situation. That can leave people wondering about the inner workings of the compliance lab. And whether that's borne out of pure curiosity or wanting to understand the system when going about their own compliance efforts, we want to share as much of that process as we can.

Thus, ten years ago we published an article License Violations and Compliance that helps to paint a picture of the work we do in the compliance lab. Beginning with an explanation of our philosophy when it comes to compliance (which has since been codified into The Principles of Community-Oriented GPL Enforcement ), the article goes on to explain the life of a compliance case. From the report of a potential violation, to confirming that a violation does exist, to the process of educating the violator about best practices, this article gives an inside look into how compliance work is actually done.

On the tenth anniversary of the publication of that article, it's remarkable how that process has remained in place. Of course, the FSF had been handling compliance work for decades at the time it was written. And while the software and devices involved in such cases has truly changed over the years, the basic principles for correcting an errors have remained unchanged.

We hope you'll enjoy looking back and learning more about how we have handled compliance issues for so long. Resources like "License Violations and Compliance" are made possible thanks to the users who support our work, here's what you can do to help

Enjoy this article? Check out our previous entry on Licensing resource series: How to choose a license for your own work

November 29, 2016 03:59 PM

November 28, 2016

FSF Blogs

Free Software Directory meeting recap for November 25th, 2016

Every week free software activists from around the world come together in #fsf on irc.freenode.org to help improve the Free Software Directory. This recaps the work we accomplished on the Friday, November 25th, 2016 meeting.

Last week's theme was friends and family, where we asked our regular volunteers to invite new volunteers to participate in the weekly meeting. mangeurdenuage had some great success posting in the Trisquel forums and some other spaces and attracted two new volunteers. They then trained the new recruits and helped them to add their first entries. While we didn't get as many new volunteers as we might have hoped, we put together some ideas for attracting more volunteers going forward.

And while the theme was about new friends and family joining us, there was still a lot of work from previous meetings that needed more attention. David_Hedlund has taken the lead in working through new requirements and categories for free software in the directory. For any free software package, a user always has the ability to modify the work to meet their needs. But for someone newly introduced to a package by the directory, there can be some other pertinent information they would like to know before diving in and downloading the software. The work we're doing on the categories should eventually make it easy for volunteers to tag certain issues with packages, and have some template text displayed on the entry. This feeds off the work we did in tagging some works as historical, but addresses a wider range of issues. While the work is not complete, a lot of progress was made at the meeting and we hope to have this feature fully implemented in the near future.

If you would like to help update the directory, meet with us every Friday in #fsf on irc.freenode.org from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. EST (18:00 to 20:00 UTC).

November 28, 2016 05:51 PM

German Arias

eiffel-cd plugin for Liberty Eiffel

I’m working in the plugin eiffel-cd, a complement for eiffel-iup. eiffel-cd is a plugin for the CD library, a vector graphics toolkit with device independent output. With this plugin you will be able to draw into the canvas of your graphical applications. This is still not complete, but is about a 70%. I you want test the eiffel-iup library (the current git repository), now it depends on eiffel-cd. These plugins will let you write your graphical applications with Liberty Eiffel. Here an screenshot:

eiffel-cd


by Germán Arias at November 28, 2016 07:37 AM

November 27, 2016

denemo @ Savannah

Version 2.0.14 is out.

New Tooltip System

Controllable Popup rate

Unaffected by Gtk changes

Preview Pane for Markup

Markup previewed as you type

Bad syntax picked up straight away

New Features

Specify total page count

Set a distinctive style for page numbers

Duplex View now shows page edges clearly

Chord Entry by MIDI keyboard without sustain pedal

Palette button creation for chord types

Reload standard palettes

Support for percent style repeats

New transposition interfaces

Comprehensive Chord Inserts palette

Mensural/Petrucci Style Palette

Conditional Behavior for Clef, Key and Time directives

Edit Book Titles with markup

Multi-line text and music

Preview Pane

Insertion of music glyphs

Insertion of Chord Symbols separated from insertion of note names

Applying effects to the selected text

Raising/Lowering of glyphs, fret diagrams etc to match text

Transcription from Source Improvements

Allow selected parts to be highlighted

Edit the masked-off sections

Reduces errors (e.g. switching to wrong part)

Polymetric Staff Support

Allow different time signatures simultaneously

Allow non-synchronous barlines

Hidden (dummy) measures

Verses at End of Music

Add further verses

Edit with preview

Multiple columns

Bug Fixes

Hide Initial clef, key, time now update print view correctly

Navigation from stale Print View fixed

InsertChord command fixed at clef change

Typeset Verses at End now copes with quotes, underscore, tildes

Fix dragging rests in Print View

Fix syllable alignment

Transpose chord root names in Display

by Richard Shann at November 27, 2016 05:04 PM

November 24, 2016

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Software Libre en la Administración y Democracia Electrónica" (Seville, Spain)

Esa charla de Richard Stallman no será técnica y será abierta al público; todos están invitados a asistir.

Lugar: Moraita de Bellavista, C/ Espejo n°37b, Sevilla, España

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Sevilla.

November 24, 2016 11:15 AM

November 23, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friends and Family Friday Directory IRC meetup: November 25th starting at 1 p.m. EST/18:00 UTC

Participate in supporting the FSD by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the FSD contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the FSD has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

This week's theme is friends and family. We have a great team of regulars showing up to help improve the directory each week, but as the saying goes, the more the merrier. So this week we're hoping that you invite your friends and family to join in on the fun. We'll be focusing on training new volunteers on how to update and improve the directory. We'll be continuing work on other projects from previous weeks as well.

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

November 23, 2016 02:40 PM

Free Software Directory meeting recap for November 18th, 2016

Every week free software activists from around the world come together in #fsf on irc.freenode.org to help improve the Free Software Directory. This recaps the work we accomplished on the Friday, November 18th, 2016 meeting.

Last week started off with a theme of outreach to maintainers of free software packages. mangeurdenuage and donaldr3 put together template volunteers can use to contact package maintainers to get them interested in keeping their own entries up to date. mangeurdenuage then went on to contact many maintainers. We hope to see everyone they contacted at upcoming meetings or at least in the revision log.

While the theme was maintainer outreach, there was still a lot of excitement about the previous week's discussion on how to deal with certain edge cases. David_Hedlund and IanKelling worked out that using categories to tag potential issues was probably the best system, as tagged categories could still flag a post with text explaining the potential issue. Lots of different categories of issues were discussed, with David_Hedlund implementing some of them for review. Those categories, their text, and implementation are still being reviewed and iterated on. That work will continue in this upcoming meeting as well, so be sure to join us all in directing the future of the directory.

If you would like to help update the directory, meet with us every Friday in #fsf on irc.freenode.org from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. EST (18:00 to 20:00 UTC).

November 23, 2016 01:46 PM

Tear the wrapping paper off the 2016 Ethical Tech Giving Guide

An activist sharing the Giving Guide at a Giveaway.

An activist sharing the Giving Guide at a Giveaway.

As software permeates more and more aspects of society, the FSF must expand our work to protect and extend computer user freedom. On Monday, we launched our yearly fundraiser with the goal of welcoming 500 new members and raising $450,000 before December 31st. Please support the work that we do: make a donation or -- better yet -- join as a member today.

Electronics are popular gifts for the holidays, but people often overlook the restrictions that manufacturers slip under the wrapping paper. From surveillance to harsh rules about copying and sharing, some gifts take more than they give.

The good news is that there are ethical companies making better devices that your loved ones can enjoy with freedom and privacy. Today, we're launching the 2016 Giving Guide, your key to smarter and more ethical tech gifts.

Explore the Giving Guide online and in print. To sweeten the deal, many of the recommended gifts are specially discounted for the holiday season.

If you appreciate the guide, we invite you to to spread the word about it. Here's what you can do:

  • Lead a Giving Guide Giveaway at a local shopping area to show that conscientious giving applies to computers and software. We've prepared a primer to answer common questions and help make your Giveaway a success.

  • Share the guide on social media with the hashtag #givefreely and comment about it on gift or tech-related online articles.

  • Email it to your family and friends – heck, you might even get a gift out of it!

Some translations are already available, but we need more volunteers to port the Giving Guide to their own languages. Check out the primer page for translation instructions.

Millions of people will open tech gifts this holiday season, and most of them will be walled gardens encumbered with nonfree software and DRM. But things are changing. With each year, our message spreads further and more people start thinking critically about technology and voting with their wallets. Join us in fueling the movement for ethical tech – use and spread this guide.

November 23, 2016 12:00 PM

November 22, 2016

GNUnet News

YBTI / We Fix the Net session at 33c3

At 33c3 the GNUNet & pEp assembly will host a "YBTI/We Fix the Net" session with a series of talks of developing secure alternatives to current internet protocols. We might hold an organized discussion or panel as well.

More details will be posted here closer to the congress. For now, please contact us at wefixthenet@gnunet.org if you would like to present your work or wish to organize a panel or other activity.

by Jeff Burdges at November 22, 2016 02:22 PM

November 21, 2016

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20161122 ('Trump') released [stable]

GNU Parallel 20161122 ('Trump') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.

Haiku of the month:

President elect:
Make parallel great again
Use GNU Parallel
-- Ole Tange

New in this release:

  • --record-env can now be used with env_parallel for bash, ksh, pdksh, and zsh.
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use programs that use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --citation)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at November 21, 2016 09:30 PM

dico @ Savannah

Version 2.4

Version 2.4 is available for download (on both main GNU FTP and Puszcza FTP). New in this release:

  • dico accepts UNIX socket name as argument to the open command
  • Fix coredump in gcide module
  • Update translations

by Sergey Poznyakoff at November 21, 2016 01:21 PM

November 17, 2016

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in Rennes, France

Ce discours de Richard Stallman ne sera pas technique, l'entrée sera libre, et tout le monde est invité à assister.

Thème, heure, et lieu précis du discours à déterminer.

Veuillez complèter notre formulaire de contact, pour que nous puissions vous annoncer de futurs événements dans la région rénnaise.

November 17, 2016 05:04 PM

Richard Stallman - "Free Software: For Your Freedom and Privacy" (Reykjavik, Iceland)

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Speech start time to be determined.

Location: to be determined

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Reykjavik.

November 17, 2016 04:06 PM

FSF Blogs

Friday Maintainers Outreach Directory IRC meetup: November 18th starting at 1 p.m. EST/18:00 UTC

Participate in supporting the FSD by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the FSD contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the FSD has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

This week we're having a focus on reaching out to maintainers of packages to help keep their entries up to date. Plenty of maintainers like to add their package to the directory in order to take advantage of all the extra publicity it can bring to a project. But keeping things up to date will have the most impact, letting users know that the package is still under active development. So this week we'll be reaching out to maintainers to help get their directory entry looking the best it can.

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

November 17, 2016 03:56 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in Kalamazoo, MI

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Speech topic and start time to be determined.

Location: Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, MI (detailed location to be determined

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Kalamazoo.

November 17, 2016 03:34 PM

Richard Stallman to speak in Grand Rapids, MI

Richard Stallman will speak about the goals and philosophy of the Free Software Movement, and the status and history of the GNU operating system, which in combination with the kernel Linux is now used by tens of millions of users world-wide.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Location: Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI (exact location to be determined)

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Grand Rapids.

November 17, 2016 03:20 PM

Richard Stallman - "Free Software - Essential for Your Freedom" (Detroit, MI)

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Location: Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (exact location to be determined)

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Detroit.

November 17, 2016 03:05 PM

FSF Blogs

Free Software Directory meeting recap for November 11th, 2016

Every week free software activists from around the world come together in #fsf on irc.freenode.org to help improve the Free Software Directory. This recaps the work we accomplished on the Friday, November 11th, 2016 meeting.

Last week was a live meeting at the Seattle GNU/Linux Conference. Iankelling and donaldr3 were joined by helpful attendees in checking whether their favorite free software packages were already included in the directory. While the directory is very robust these days, most packages suggested were actually already included, there were a few new entries added. It was just a great opportunity to meet with people who weren't already involved in the directory and to help them get involved by learning about the project.

On the channel, there was also a long discussion about updating the requirements for the directory. The channel discussed two different scenarios which we have name 'bait and surrender' and 'freedom betrayed'. In 'bait and surrender', a developer offers an inferior free software version of their work in attempt to get users to surrender their freedom and switch to a more fully featured proprietary version. In 'freedom betrayed', a formerly free software project changes to a proprietary license. In both cases, we want to make clear to users that while there may be a free software version available that they have to be wary of the project, and understand that there are proprietary versions. The channel came up with a proposal to tag these different situations, which is now being discussed on the mailing list.

The meeting concluded with deciding that the next meeting should focus on contacting maintainers to help them include their packages on the directory or keep their entries up to date.

If you would like to help update the directory, meet with us every Friday in #fsf on irc.freenode.org from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. EST (18:00 to 20:00 UTC).

November 17, 2016 02:31 PM