Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

January 30, 2015

FSF Blogs

You've brought us this far. One last push before Sunday.

In the past twelve months alone, the free software community has:

  • Written 268 new releases to GNU packages, keeping world-class software in the hands of everyone

  • Helped the FSF write, test, and translate Email Self-Defense, so that computer users of all levels can enhance everyone's email privacy using free software

  • Used the User Liberation video and free software badges to get newcomers thinking about free software for the first time

  • Made LibrePlanet 2014 our biggest (322 participants!) conference ever and helped us fund fourteen travel scholarships, enabling important face-to-face meetings between free software activists, developers, and newcomers from all over the world

  • Pounded the pavement in multiple cities on the International Day Against DRM, building public opposition to unethical technological restrictions

Meanwhile, the FSF's experts and activists have

  • Provided vital technical infrastructure to the GNU Project, connected developers to projects, and helped get them funded for their work

  • Helped twenty companies and organizations properly respect the GNU General Public License and other free software licenses, so that free software remains truly free

  • Certified five new devices to Respect Your Freedom, getting us closer to a world where you can walk into a store and buy from a selection of hardware that works 100% with free software

  • Worked with hardware companies to bring you awesome deals through the 2014 Giving Guide, while also encouraging more ethical gifting

  • Called a gathering of free software experts to breathe new life into the High Priority Projects initiative, which will bring attention and resources to the key stumbling blocks for users trying to win back their freedom

Our part of this work relies on your financial support, and this is the time of year that we need it most. Our annual fundraiser is coming to a close on Saturday, and we're still short of our goal of $525,000. Many of you have already chipped in, and we are thankful to every one who has.

The FSF can't rest now, though -- we need to meet our goal so that we can keep doing amazing things for computer user freedom and providing every tool and resource we can think of to help the free software community thrive.

More than 10,000 people visit this site every day. If each of you give $14, it will be enough to push us over our goal and ensure we can win new victories for free software in 2015. If only a small portion of you become members, it will be enough.

Because we receive 80% of our support from individuals like you, this yearly winter fundraiser is incredibly important us -- all of our decisions about how much we can do the following year depend on how well the fundraiser goes. And since it's our thirtieth anniversary year, we want to do a lot! This coming year, the money that we raise now will help us

  • Fund more hardware, bandwidth, and infrastructure used by GNU software developers and free software activists worldwide

  • Supply modest salaries for staff to work full-time defending your freedom

  • Build an emergency reserve to defend free software against legal threats from proprietary software companies

  • Get FSF representatives to events around the world to spread the word and strengthen regional free software movements

  • Create high-quality communications campaigns to show the injustice of proprietary software and point to a better way

We have the highest possible rating of four stars from Charity Navigator, an organization that evaluates how effectively and responsibly nonprofits use donations. Part of the reason for this is that we use 79% of all money raised for our program work promoting and defending free software, rather than administrative costs or fundraising.

No matter how carefully and strategically we use the resources we have, we don't even come close to the arsenal at the disposal of proprietary software giants like Microsoft and Apple. But that doesn't mean we can't take them on. Thirty years ago, we were just a handful of hackers with a dream. Now we're a powerful global movement. For the next thirty years, we'll keep pushing towards a future where proprietary software is a thing of the past, and the rights of all users are respected.

If this vision of the future inspires you as much as it inspires us, we hope you join us by donating or becoming a member.

January 30, 2015 11:37 PM

GNUnet News

2nd Dev Mumble - Feb 2nd, 8pm CET @ gnunet.org

Hi devs,
next round for the dev mumble on Monday, Feb 2nd, 8pm CET.
The mumble server is running @ gnunet.org.
Cheers!

by Matthias Wachs at January 30, 2015 03:36 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "The Free Software Movement" (Ankara, Turkey)

The Free Software Movement campaigns for computer users' freedom to cooperate and control their own computing. The Free Software Movement developed the GNU operating system, typically used together with the kernel Linux, specifically to make these freedoms possible.

Richard Stallman's speech will be part of the 11th edition of BİLMÖK (2015-03-06--08). It will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location: Ankara Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi / Ankara University School of Medicine Campus - Morfoloji Binası / Morphology Building - Ord. Prof. Dr. Abdülkadir Noyan Konfreans Salonu / Ord. Prof. Dr. Abdulkadir Noyan Conference Hall - Sıhhiye/Ankara/Türkiye / Sihhiye/Ankara/Turkey.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Ankara.

January 30, 2015 10:40 AM

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Ankara, Turkey)

Richard Stallman will speak about the goals and philosophy of the Free Software Movement, and the status and history of the GNU operating system, which in combination with the kernel Linux is now used by tens of millions of users world-wide.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Ankara.

January 30, 2015 10:26 AM

Richard Stallman - "Copyright vs Community" (Istanbul, Turkey)

Copyright developed in the age of the printing press, and was designed to fit with the system of centralized copying imposed by the printing press. But the copyright system does not fit well with computer networks, and only draconian punishments can enforce it.
The global corporations that profit from copyright are lobbying for draconian punishments, and to increase their copyright powers, while suppressing public access to technology. But if we seriously hope to serve the only legitimate purpose of copyright--to promote progress, for the benefit of the public--then we must make changes in the other direction.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Istanbul.

January 30, 2015 10:22 AM

Richard Stallman - "A Free Digital Society" (Istanbul, Turkey)

There are many threats to freedom in the digital society. They include massive surveillance, censorship, digital handcuffs, nonfree software that controls users, and the War on Sharing. Other threats come from use of web services. Finally, we have no positive right to do anything in the Internet; every activity is precarious, and can continue only as long as companies are willing to cooperate with it.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Istanbul.

January 30, 2015 10:16 AM

January 29, 2015

FSF News

Libreboot X200 laptop now FSF-certified to respect your freedom

LibreBoot X200

This is the second Libreboot laptop from Gluglug (a project of Minifree, Ltd.) to achieve RYF certification, the first being the Libreboot X60 in December 2013. The Libreboot X200 offers many improvements over the Libreboot X60, including a faster CPU, faster graphics, 64-bit GNU/Linux support (on all models), support for more RAM, higher screen resolution, and more. The Libreboot X200 can be purchased from Gluglug at http://shop.gluglug.org.uk/product/libreboot-x200/.

The Libreboot X200 is a refurbished and updated laptop based on the Lenovo ThinkPad X200. In order to produce a laptop that achieved the Free Software Foundation's certification guidelines, the developers at Gluglug had to replace the low-level firmware as well as the operating system. Microsoft Windows was replaced with the FSF-endorsed Trisquel GNU/Linux operating system, which includes the GNOME 3 desktop environment. The free software boot system of Libreboot and the GNU GRUB 2 bootloader were adapted to replace the stock proprietary firmware, which included a BIOS, Intel's Management Engine system, and Intel's Active Management Technology (AMT) firmware.

The FSF has previously written about Intel's ME and AMT, calling attention to how this proprietary software introduces a fundamental security flaw -- a back door -- into a person's machine that allows a perpetrator to remotely access the computer over a network. It enables powering the computer on and off, configuring and upgrading the BIOS, wiping the hard drives, reinstalling the operating system, and more. While there is a BIOS option to ostensibly disable AMT, because the BIOS itself is proprietary, the user has no means to verify whether this is sufficient. The functionality provided by the ME/AMT could be a very useful security and recovery measure, but only if the user has control over the software and the ability to install modified versions of it.

"The ME and its extension, AMT, are serious security issues on modern Intel hardware and one of the main obstacles preventing most Intel based systems from being liberated by users. On most systems, it is extremely difficult to remove, and nearly impossible to replace. Libreboot X200 is the first system where it has actually been removed, permanently," said Gluglug Founder and CEO, Francis Rowe.

"This is a huge accomplishment, but unfortunately, it is not known if the work they have done to remove the ME and AMT from this device will be applicable to newer Intel-based laptops. It is incredibly frustrating to think that free software developers may have to invest even more time and energy into figuring out how to simply remove proprietary firmware without rendering the hardware nonfunctional. On top of that, the firmware in question poses a serious security threat to its users -- and the organizations who employ them. We call on Intel to work with us to enable removal of ME and AMT for users who don't want it on their machines," said FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

In order to remove the ME, AMT, and other proprietary firmware from the laptop, the Libreboot developers had to first reverse engineer Intel's firmware. They then created a small software utility to produce a free firmware image that conforms to Intel's specifications. Finally, to install their firmware on the device, they used special hardware (an SPI flasher) that they directly connected to a small chip on the motherboard itself. After many months of work, the Libreboot developers managed to completely overwrite the proprietary firmware with Libreboot and GNU GRUB 2. Those who purchase a Libreboot X200 from Gluglug will receive a laptop that has had all of this work already done to it and will be able to update or install new firmware to their device without needing to make use of any special hardware or complicated procedures.

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom hardware certification, including details on the certification of the Libreboot X200, visit http://www.fsf.org/ryf. Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult http://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

Subscribers to the FSF's Free Software Supporter newsletter will receive announcements about future Respects Your Freedom products.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Gluglug and Minifree, Ltd

Francis Rowe is the Founder and CEO of Minifree Ltd in the UK, which owns and operates Gluglug, a project to promote adoption of free software globally. To purchase products sold by Gluglug, visit http://shop.gluglug.org.uk.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Francis Rowe
Founder & CEO
Gluglug
info@gluglug.org.uk

January 29, 2015 09:25 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Por una Sociedad Digital Libre" (Zaragoza, Spain)

Existen muchas amenazas a la libertad en la sociedad digital, tales como la vigilancia masiva, la censura, las esposas digitales, el software privativo que controla a los usuarios y la guerra contra la práctica de compartir. El uso de servicios web presenta otras más amenazas a la libertad de los usuarios. Por último, no contamos con ningún derecho concreto para hacer nada en Internet, todas nuestras actividades en línea son precarias y podremos continuar con ellas siempre y cuando las empresas deseen cooperar.

Esa charla de Richard Stallman no será técnica y será abierta al público; todos están invitados a asistir.

El lugar exacto de la charla será determinado.

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Zaragoza.

January 29, 2015 01:48 PM

January 28, 2015

guix @ Savannah

GNU Guix 0.8.1 released

We are pleased to announce the next alpha release of GNU Guix, version 0.8.1.

The release comes both with a source tarball, which allows you to install it on top of a running GNU/Linux system, and a USB installation image to install the standalone Guix System Distribution.

The highlights for this release include:

See the original announcement for details.

About GNU Guix

GNU Guix is a functional package manager for the GNU system. The Guix System Distribution is an advanced distribution of the GNU system.

In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. It also offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, except that packages are defined as native Guile modules, using extensions to the Scheme language.

At this stage the Guix System Distribution can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el and armv7.

by Ludovic Courtès at January 28, 2015 11:58 PM

gnuzilla @ Savannah

IceCat 31.4.0 release

GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0. https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/

Source tarballs, binaries for generic GNU/Linux systems and translations are available at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuzilla/31.4.0/
GPG key ID:D7E04784 GNU IceCat releases
Fingerprint: A573 69A8 BABC 2542 B5A0 368C 3C76 EED7 D7E0 4784

The most noticeable change for the users in this release would be the addition of the html5-video-everywhere, that allows video playback from several popular services without either Flash or JavaScript.

The user manual pages are at http://libreplanet.org/wiki/Group:IceCat/
You can contribute by joining the wiki and editing the manuals.

Changes since v31.2.0

  • Updated to v31.4.0ESR
  • Search form in about:icecat now searches in default search engine
  • Disabled accessibility.blockautorefresh
  • Replaced references to Open Source with Free Software where applicable
  • Added html5-video-everywhere v0.1.1 extension:

https://github.com/lejenome/html5-video-everywhere

  • Updated LibreJS to 6.0.8
  • Updated https-everywhere to 4.0.3

by Ruben Rodriguez at January 28, 2015 09:21 PM

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: January 30

Join the FSF and friends on Friday, January 30, from 2pm to 5pm EST (19:00 to 22:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.


Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.


While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!


If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

January 28, 2015 08:26 PM

January 27, 2015

guix @ Savannah

GNU Guix at FOSDEM

Guix will be present at FOSDEM in Brussels, Belgium, with a talk entitled "The Emacs of Distros" this Saturday, at 3PM, in room H.1302.

The talk will give an update on developments in Guix and the Guix System Distribution since last year, and will explain and demo the overall philosophy behind its design---how Guix seeks to empower users.

Hope to see you there!

by Ludovic Courtès at January 27, 2015 09:33 AM

January 24, 2015

GNUnet News

January 23, 2015

bison @ Savannah

bison-3.0.4 released [stable]

Bison 3.0.4 is a long overdue bug fix release.

Bison is a general-purpose parser generator that converts an annotated
context-free grammar into a deterministic LR or generalized LR (GLR)
parser employing LALR(1) parser tables. Bison can also generate
IELR(1) or canonical LR(1) parser tables. Once you are proficient with
Bison, you can use it to develop a wide range of language parsers,
from those used in simple desk calculators to complex programming
languages.

Bison is upward compatible with Yacc: all properly-written Yacc
grammars ought to work with Bison with no change. Anyone familiar with
Yacc should be able to use Bison with little trouble. You need to be
fluent in C or C++ programming in order to use Bison. Java is also
supported.

Enjoy!

by Akim Demaille at January 23, 2015 02:10 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Brussels, Belgium)

Richard Stallman will speak about the goals and philosophy of the Free Software Movement, and the status and history of the GNU operating system, which in combination with the kernel Linux is now used by tens of millions of users world-wide.

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Brussels.

January 23, 2015 10:10 AM

rcs @ Savannah

RCS 5.9.4 available

GNU RCS (Revision Control System) 5.9.4 is available.

The full announcement was posted to the info-gnu mailing list:

by Thien-Thi Nguyen at January 23, 2015 09:02 AM

January 22, 2015

FSF Events

[CANCELLED] John Sullivan - "Freedom Embedded," at FOSDEM (Brussels, Belgium)

FSF executive director John Sullivan will giving his talk "Freedom Embedded: Devices that Respect their Users" at this year's edition of FOSDEM:

GNU and Linux are now embedded on more kinds of hardware than ever, but often only by requiring proprietary bits. Plus, we now have tablets and phones loaded with nonfree software on top of a free core -- how do we get the freedom we all want, and how do we create the market for that? The Free Software Foundation has a certification program called "Respects Your Freedom" that awards a certification mark to hardware meeting a set of standards (fsf.org/ryf). Embedded devices are a major target for the future of this program.
It has already made significant gains, especially over the last two years, certifying USB wifi adapters, 3D printers, home wifi routers, and a laptop. Even bigger things are planned, and most involve the embedded world. Hear about what's in store, learn what it takes to get your embedded product certified, hear about the impact of certification so far, and discuss possible improvements to the program.

John's appearance has regrettably had to be cancelled, due to illness.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Brussels.

January 22, 2015 12:55 PM

January 21, 2015

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20150122 (' (((:~{> Je Suis Charlie') released

GNU Parallel 20150122 (' (((:~{> Je Suis Charlie') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parallel/

Haiku of the month:

If not enough time:
Run jobs using Parallel.
Keeps CPUs warm.
-- Ole Tange

New in this release:

  • Remote jobs now send stderr (standard error) to stderr (standard error) instead of stdout (standard output).
  • Remote execution command is now packed using base64 encoded bzip2. This means that big environments (app. 100 KB) can be transferred. This change makes remote execution alpha quality.
  • --semaphoretimeout now takes a negative value. This means give up if the semaphore is not gotten within the timeout.
  • --halt -1 and -2 now means halt if a job succeeds (so the opposite of 1 and 2).
  • --no-keep-order will reverse --keep-order.
  • Bash's second fix of shellshock caused --env to break again when exporting functions. This has been fixed again.
  • A semibig refactoring of big functions. All non-trivial functions are now less than 100 lines. The refactoring makes this release beta quality.
  • A description of the design decisions for GNU Parallel can be found in 'man parallel_design'.
  • A bug fix in replacement strings caused rewrite of the replacement function. This makes use of replacement strings alpha quality.
  • GNU Parallel was used (unfortunately without citation) in: Large Scale Author Name Disambiguation in Digital Libraries http://semanticommunity.info/@api/deki/files/31523/P227_3546.pdf
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job is can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --bibtex)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at January 21, 2015 09:48 PM

January 20, 2015

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Copyright vs Community" (Setif, Algeria)

Copyright developed in the age of the printing press, and was designed to fit with the system of centralized copying imposed by the printing press. But the copyright system does not fit well with computer networks, and only draconian punishments can enforce it.
The global corporations that profit from copyright are lobbying for draconian punishments, and to increase their copyright powers, while suppressing public access to technology. But if we seriously hope to serve the only legitimate purpose of copyright--to promote progress, for the benefit of the public--then we must make changes in the other direction.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is free of charge, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Sétif.

January 20, 2015 12:42 PM

Richard Stallman - "A Free Digital Society" (Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria)

There are many threats to freedom in the digital society. They include massive surveillance, censorship, digital handcuffs, nonfree software that controls users, and the War on Sharing. Other threats come from use of web services. Finally, we have no positive right to do anything in the Internet; every activity is precarious, and can continue only as long as companies are willing to cooperate with it.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is free of charge, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Exact location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Siddi Bel Abbès.

January 20, 2015 12:34 PM

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Algiers, Algeria)

Richard Stallman will speak about the goals and philosophy of the Free Software Movement, and the status and history of the GNU operating system, which in combination with the kernel Linux is now used by tens of millions of users world-wide.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Algiers.

January 20, 2015 10:55 AM

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Djelfa, Algeria)

The Free Software Movement campaigns for computer users' freedom to cooperate and control their own computing. The Free Software Movement developed the GNU operating system, typically used together with the kernel Linux, specifically to make these freedoms possible.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Djelfa.

January 20, 2015 10:52 AM

January 19, 2015

libtool @ Savannah

GNU libtool-2.4.5 released [stable]

Libtoolers!

The Libtool Team is pleased to announce the release of libtool 2.4.5.

GNU Libtool hides the complexity of using shared libraries behind a
consistent, portable interface. GNU Libtool ships with GNU libltdl, which
hides the complexity of loading dynamic runtime libraries (modules)
behind a consistent, portable interface.

This is a bugfix release and a recommended upgrade for all users. Most
likely, this will be the last release that supports copying the libltdl
sources directly into your project -- libltdl is widely deployed now, and
there is absolutely no reason to give it special treatment compared to
any other library a project depends on.

Here are the compressed sources:
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/libtool/libtool-2.4.5.tar.gz (1.7MB)
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/libtool/libtool-2.4.5.tar.xz (952KB)

Here are the GPG detached signatures[*]:
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/libtool/libtool-2.4.5.tar.gz.sig
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/libtool/libtool-2.4.5.tar.xz.sig

Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth:
http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html

[*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the
.sig suffix) is intact. First, be sure to download both the .sig file
and the corresponding tarball. Then, run a command like this:

gpg --verify libtool-2.4.5.tar.gz.sig

If that command fails because you don't have the required public key,
then run this command to import it:

gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 151308092983D606

and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command.

This release was bootstrapped with the following tools:
Autoconf 2.69
Automake 1.15
Gnulib v0.1-336-g342d9f0

NEWS

  • Noteworthy changes in release 2.4.5 (2015-01-19) [stable]
    • New features:

- Libtoolize searches for the best available M4 on the user PATH at
runtime, rather than settling for the first one found.

- Support munging sys_lib_dlsearch_path_spec with LT_SYS_LIBRARY_PATH
environment variable.

    • Bug fixes:

- Bail out at configure time if the installed M4 is not sufficient
for the purposes of libtoolize.

- freebsd-elf library versioning was upgraded incorrectly in 2.4.4,
but now works properly again.

- Fix a 2.4.4 regression so that libltdl subprojects do not warn
about missing libltdl/libltdl directory as in prior releases.

- When using Sun C++ on Solaris or GNU/Linux we used to set libtool's
postdeps permanently, based on the contents of $CXX and $CXXFLAGS at
configure time, which was brittle and error-prone. Now, we no
longer check for a SunCC ABI at configure time, but augment the
postdeps at libtool time based on the current invocation flags on
each call.

    • Changes in supported systems or compilers:

- /usr/local prefixed rpaths are now added to the link-line on
ia64-hp-hpux*, because the default system runtime loader path does
not contain them.

- Previously, when using Sun C++ on Solaris or GNU/Linux, `-Cstd -Crun`
flags were added to $postdeps unless CXX or CXXFLAGS contained
`-library=stlport4`. Newer releases have added other compiler flags
that are also incompatible with `-Cstd -Crun`, so now we don't add
them if any of `-std=c++[0-9][0-9]`, `-library=stdcxx4` or
`-compat=g` were found in CXX or CXXFLAGS when the Sun C++ compiler
is detected.

Enjoy!

by Gary V. Vaughan at January 19, 2015 05:11 PM

Nick Clifton

January 2015 GNU Toolchain Update

Hi Guys,

  There have been three toolchain component releases this month:

  * GDB 7.8.2 has been released.

    This is mainly a bug-fix release.  A branch for GDB 7.9 has been created, so a new major release can be expected soon.


  * BINUTILS 2.25 has been released.

    Important changes in this release include:

    * The strings program now defaults to displaying text from any part of the executable, not just its data sections.  This means that, by default, strings does not need to use the BFD library to scan the binary, and so it is not exposed to bug that might be present in that library.  The old behaviour - of only showing strings from inside non-code sections, can be enabled via the --data command line option.

      The strings program also now has a --include-all-whitespace command line option, so that newlines carriage returns are also considered to be part of a string.

    * The objcopy program gains a --dump-section <name>=<file> command line option to place a raw copy of the contents of the specified section into the specified file.

    * Support has been added for the Andes NDS32 and AVR Tiny microcontrollers.  In addition the openrisc and or32 targets have been replaced by the or1k target.

     * The ARM port to gas can now accept the assembler output from the CodeComposer Studio tool.

     * PE binaries now once again contain real timestamps by default, although this can be disabled via the --no-insert-timestamps.  Timestamps are needed because some other (non-GNU) tools cannot handle PE binaries without them.

     * COFF based targets now have support for the --build-id command line option to add a unique signature to a binary.


  * NEWLIB 2.2.0 has been released.

    Changes in this version include:
  
    * Multiple functional/performance enhancements for arm/aarch64.

    * New nano formatted I/O support for small memory targets.

    * Adds a reentrant safe sorting routine: qsort_r.

    * Additional long double math routines.

    * Adds the itoa/utoa/ltoa integer to string conversion routines.
  
    * Restructuring of gmtime/localtime so tz functions are only linked by localtime.

    * Unlocked I/O functions.

  
  In the development versions of the tools there has also been a lot  of changes too:

  * The --compress-debug-sections is now turned on for Linux/x86 by default in the binutils.

  * GCC has a new command line option: -fopenacc

    This enables handling of the OpenACC #pragma acc.  This makes the compiler generate accelerated code according to the OpenACC Application Programming Interface v2.0 (http://www.openacc.org/).  This is an experimental feature, incomplete, and subject to change in future versions of GCC. See https://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/OpenACC for more information.

  * The GCC command line option -Warray-bounds can now take a numeric argument, as in -Warray-bounds=[1,2].  The default value is 1, which matches the old behaviour.  If a value of 2 is used then warnings will also be generated for out of bounds access for arrays at the end of a struct and for arrays accessed through pointers.  This warning level may give a larger number of false positives which is why it is not enabled by default.
 
  * The GCC stack protection feature (-fstack-protector) can now be enabled only for specifically attributed functions via the use of the -fstack-protector-explicit command line option and the stack_protect function attribute.

  * G++ has a new command line option: -fsized-deallocation

    This is part of the C++14 specification.  It enables the built-in declaration of the global functions:

     void operator delete (void *, std::size_t) noexcept;
      void operator delete[] (void *, std::size_t) noexcept;


    which provides for faster deallocation of fixed size objects.  The new command line option: -Wsized-deallocation can be enabled to warn about places that might want to make use of this feature.

  * G++ also has a new warning option: -Wc++14-compat

    This warns about C++ constructs whose meaning differs between ISO C++ 2011 and ISO C++ 2014.  This warning is enabled by -Wall.

  * The ARM port now supports the XGene 1 core.

Cheers
  Nick

January 19, 2015 10:02 AM

January 18, 2015

librejs @ Savannah

GNU LibreJS 6.0.8 released

There's a new version of LibreJS - version 6.0.8.

LibreJS is a Mozilla add-on that prevents nonfree JavaScript programs
from running in your web browser.

First, there's an update on LibreJS development: I've moved the primary
development repository from Bazaar to Git. I've also removed all of the
large objects in the new repository's history, so it's much easier to
clone. Instead of 77MB, it now takes 4.4MB. The history for the old
repository is still available in Bazaar:

http://bzr.savannah.gnu.org/lh/librejs/

You can see the new repository's web interface here:

http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/librejs.git/

My reasoning is that, although Bazaar was working fine, using git will
help with collaboration because most people are already familiar with it.
As noted in the changelog below, LibreJS has been getting a lot of
patches and suggestions -- I hope that continues.

Here's the changes since 6.0.7:
- LibreJS now accepts the Eclipse Public License. Thanks to
Daniel Ziltener for the patch.

- Fixed a bug that caused the main panel to disappear after
clicking the red "Whitelist" button on a script that wasn't
accepted by LibreJS.

- You can now specify multiple licenses for a JavaScript file
that's been compiled or concatenated from more than one source
file. Info on how to do this is in the manual - search for
"Specifying multiple licenses". Thanks to Arne Möhle for
starting a discussion that led to this change.

- You can now move the "Complain" button out of the way if it's
blocking something on the website you're looking at. Thanks to
Alexandre Garreau for pointing out this problem.

- Applied a patch from Lutz Horn: updating the whitelisted
scripts to include some more libraries, and improving the
gethash.sh script.

This project's website is here:
https://www.gnu.org/software/librejs/

The source files are here:
https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/librejs/librejs-6.0.8.tar.gz (929k)

And here's the executable you can install in your browser:
https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/librejs/librejs-6.0.8.xpi (446k)

by Nik Nyby at January 18, 2015 05:04 AM

January 17, 2015

GNUtls

January 16, 2015

FSF Blogs

Free Software Everywhere in the LibrePlanet 2015 program

You get LibrePlanet 2015: Free Software Everywhere, March 21-22, 2015 at MIT in Cambridge, MA.

This year's program showcases how free software is used around the world, from "Engaging Nepali kids with free software" to "Implementing electronic medical record systems in rural Haiti​." We're also taking a close look at how international treaties will affect free software users, with sessions from April -- a French free software activist organization -- and Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The conference will explore the importance of free software in different contexts, such as "When open is not enough: educators and academia grapple with the need for libre," and "Librarians fight back: free software solutions for digital privacy."

And if you're looking to pick up some serious free software skills, LibrePlanet 2015 has some great workshops planned, like "Will it blend?", a Blender tutorial with Bassam Kurdali, the animator of our User Lib video. And of course, we'll have a workshop for all of you who want to learn to "Rock your Emacs."

In addition to all these great sessions, LibrePlanet 2015 will feature keynotes from two of free software's biggest thinkers: Benjamin Mako Hill and Karen Sandler.

The full draft program is now online. Go check it out -- we're pretty sure you'll want to register after taking a look at all the conference has to offer. Remember, FSF members and students attend gratis, so the best way to attend is to become a member (if you aren't one already).

At LibrePlanet, we bring together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and address challenges to software freedom. Newcomers are always welcome, and LibrePlanet 2015 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels. LibrePlanet 2015 is produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation with the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

So, what are you waiting for? Register for LibrePlanet 2015 today!

January 16, 2015 09:35 PM

January 15, 2015

GNUnet News

GNUnet Dev Mumble - Jan 15 2014, 8pm CET

Dear devs and all interested readers,

we are happy to announce today's GNUnet developer mumble taking place

- Jan 15 2014 (aka today), 8pm CET

To join just connect to the mumble server running at gnunet.org and join
the developers channel...

We meet to discuss current projects, overall agenda and to exchange what
people are working on at the moment.

If you are interested feel free to join ...

by Matthias Wachs at January 15, 2015 11:37 AM

January 14, 2015

Riccardo Mottola

BatMon.app OpenBSD ACPI support

I just committed  ACPI support on OpenBSD for GAP's Battery Monitor.
Check it out and enjoy GNUstep on your laptops.

by Riccardo (noreply@blogger.com) at January 14, 2015 08:14 AM

January 13, 2015

FSF Blogs

These pictures are worth 1,024 words

These beautiful badges come in four different styles, each with three color schemes to pick from. They're perfect for sharing on social media or embedding on your Web site or blog, and we've provided embed code that links back to pages that will help new people get acquainted with free software.

Choose your favorite badge and start sharing. You may want to explore our thoughts on different social media platforms.

Best of all, the badges are licensed under CC BY 4.0, made by our friends at Manufactura Independente using all free software, and their source files are available, so you can translate and remix them to your heart's content.

We love giving you beautiful things to represent free software, and we want to make more. Can you donate $40 to help us do more of this in 2015?

In addition to being nice-looking and fun, we think that works like these badges are an important part of winning free software the recognition and respect it deserves in the broader world beyond computing. A picture is worth 1,024 words, and the easier it is for our friends, family members and policy-makers to understand our message, the more influential our movement will be.

Enjoy the badges, and please donate.

January 13, 2015 08:35 PM