Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

April 24, 2015

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "A Free Digital Society" (Athens, Greece)

There are many threats to freedom in the digital society. They include massive surveillance, censorship, digital handcuffs, nonfree software that controls users, and the War on Sharing. Other threats come from use of web services. Finally, we have no positive right to do anything in the Internet; every activity is precarious, and can continue only as long as companies are willing to cooperate with it.

This speech by Richard Stallman will be part of Commons Fest (2015-05-15--17). It will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Athens.

April 24, 2015 05:38 PM

April 23, 2015

GNUnet News

6th Dev Mumble - April 27th, 9pm CEST @ gnunet.org

Hi devs,

On the 27th we get to officially announce the results from the GSoC application process to the students, so we should probably use this opportunity to also have a first discussion with those that have been selected. So, let's have the 6th develper Mumble on Monday, April 27th, 9pm CEST, as usual using the Mumble server on gnunet.org. Agenda items include:

  • GSoC announcements and planning
  • GNUnet 0.10.2 release: To CADET or not to CADET?

I hope all GSoC applicants, mentors and Bart can make it, naturally everybody is welcome to join.

by Christian Grothoff at April 23, 2015 05:22 PM

April 22, 2015

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20150422 ('Germanwings') released

GNU Parallel 20150422 ('Germanwings') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parallel/

Haiku of the month:

SSH set up?
Instant cluster needed now?
Use GNU Parallel.
-- Ole Tange

New in this release:

  • Security fix. An attacker on the local system could make you overwrite one of your own files with a single byte. The problem exist when you use --compress or --tmux or --pipe or --cat or --fifo. The attacker must figure out the randomly chosen file name and create a symlink within a time window of 15 ms.
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job is can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --bibtex)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at April 22, 2015 11:20 PM

April 21, 2015

www @ Savannah

April 20, 2015

FSF Blogs

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Matt Lee from The List powered by Creative Commons

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Matt Lee, a lead developer of The List, which is licensed under the GNU Affero General Public License version 3 (AGPLv3), or at your option, any later version. Matt is the technical lead at Creative Commons. Matt has been working in free software for over a decade and is a notable contributor to the GNU project and a former Campaigns Manager at the Free Software Foundation, as well as co-founder of Libre.fm and GNU social. Currently Matt is raising funds to produce a film this summer, Orang-U: An Ape Goes to College, which he plans to edit using entirely free software and release under a CC BY-SA license.

Can you tell us a bit about The List?

No one can be everywhere at once. But everyone can.

NGOs, journalists, government agencies, and cultural institutions all need photographs to tell their story and educate others. But there’s no way for those organizations to be in the right place at the right time, every time. That’s where we come in.

Through The List, organizations will provide lists of locations, people, and events that they need photographs of. And when users are in the right place at the right time, they can claim an item from the list and publish a photograph of it.

What inspired the creation of The List?

The List powered by Creative Commons is an experiment to see if we can make it easier for people to contribute to the public commons. There are millions of places for images that exist in the public commons in our daily lives, from newspaper articles to photos and illustrations on Wikipedia. The List hopes to bring the people who have a need for such images and the people who may take them, together.

How are people using it?

Right now we're still prototyping things and we're working on getting some real world items into The List, but the way it works is pretty simple: you fire up the app, choose some categories of things you're interested in such as pets, beverages, etc. Then we show you an item that matches the category, and the requesting organization (Wikipedia, FSF, etc.) can choose to add it to your list or not. After you go through this process a couple of times, you wind up with a personal to-do list of images. Taking an image is easy, too: just tap it, tap the camera and take your photo. Or you can upload a photo you've already taken. The photo is then sent to some servers at Creative Commons, where we add metadata and produce a variety of thumbnails of the image, before sending it over to the Internet Archive for permanent storage. And moments later, the image is in the gallery in the app on your phone.

What features do you think really sets The List apart from similar software?

I don't think there's anything else like this out there. For the first time, there's an application that makes it quick and easy to contribute to the public commons, and we do that by hiding a lot of the detail away from the user. For example, instead of presenting a choice of the six Creative Commons licenses, we choose one and all images are licensed in the same manner. It's also a license that's compatible with Wikipedia and other similar projects—Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Why did you choose the AGPLv3 as The List's license?

In addition to The List mobile app, there's a web app in development too. We based the web app and the processing code on GNU FM, a project I started back in 2009 that powers music communities such as Libre.fm. That code is under the AGPL as well, and it's a code base I am intimately familiar with. So much so that we're using it for another project too: a new federated search project at Creative Commons.

How can users (technical or otherwise) help contribute to The List?

The first thing you can do is if you have an Android phone, come try one of the public beta releases on the website, https://thelist.creativecommons.org.

If you're good at Android programming, you'll find our Android app in our source code under app/.

If you're look at PHP, look under webapp/.

And if you'd like to make some improvements to our website, they're up there too under www/.

We have a really simple contributor agreement up there too. And we licensed that under CC0, if you'd like to use it for your own project.

All of this and more can be found at https://github.com/creativecommons/list.

What's the next big thing for The List?

The next big thing will be a proper public release. We're already talking to the F-Droid folks, and we'll be in all the places you normally find apps for your phone. And F-Droid will have the pure, free software experience.

*Enjoyed this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series, featuring Rainey Reitman, Activism Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about their new EFF Alerts mobile app.

April 20, 2015 04:00 PM

gnuastro @ Savannah

Gnuastro webpage is activated

The Gnuastro webpage ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gnuastro/ ) was activated and the documentation is now available. There is still a lot of work to do until it is ready for release though.

Announcements will be done using the info-gnuastro@gnu.org mailing list.

by Mohammad Akhlaghi at April 20, 2015 05:00 AM

April 19, 2015

Nick Clifton

April 2015 GNU Toolchain Update

Hi Guys,

  There are several things to report this month:

  * The GCC version 5 branch has been created.  No releases have been made from this branch yet, but when one happens it will be GCC 5.1.  Meanwhile the mainline development sources have been switched to calling themselves GCC version 6.

  * Support has been added for configuring targets that use the Nuxi CloudABI.  More details of this ABI can be found here:  https://github.com/NuxiNL/cloudlibc

  * The linker and assembler now support an option to control how DWARF debug sections are compressed:  --compress-debug-sections=[none|zlib|zlib-gnu|zlib-gabi]

    Selecting none disables compression.  This is the default behaviour if this option is not used.  Selecting zlib or zlib-gnu compresses the sections and then renames them to start with a .z.  This is the old method of indicating that a debug section has been compressed.  Selecting zlib-gabi compresses the sections, but rather than renaming them they instead have the new SHF_COMPRESSED bit set in their ELF section header.

    The other binutils tools have been updated to recognise and handle this SHF_COMPRESSED bit.  More information on the new bit can be found here: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/generic-abi/dBOS1H47Q64/PaJvELtaJrsJ

    In another, related change, the binutils will no longer compress a debug section if doing so would actually make it bigger.

    Also the zlib compression/decompression library sources have now been brought in to the binutils git repository and are now a standard part of a binutils release.

    * The linker has a new command line option:  --warn-orphan
      This option tells the linker to generate a warning message whenever it has to guess at the placement of a section in the output file.  This happens when the linker script in use does not specify where the section should go.

    * The compiler has a new option: -fsanitize-sections=sec1,sec2,...
      This tells the address sanitizer to add protection to global variables defined in the named section(s).  By default any globals in sections with user defined names are not sanitized as the compiler does not know what is going to happen to them.  In particular variables in such sections sometimes end up being merged into an array of values, where the presence of address sanitization markers would break the array.

   * The AVR port of the compiler has a new command line option: -nodevicelib
     This tells the compiler not to link against AVR-LibC's device specific library libdev.a.

  * The RX port of GCC has a new command line option to disable the use of RX string instructions (SMOVF, SUNTIL, etc).  This matters because it is unsafe to use these instructions if the program might access the I/O portion of the address space.

  * The RL78 port of GCC now has support the multiply and divide instructions provided by the G14 cpu, and the divide hardware peripheral provided by the G13 core.

  * GDB now honours the content of the file /proc/PID/coredump_filter on GNU/Linux systems.  This file can be used to specify the types of memory mappings that will be include in a corefile.  For more information, please refer to the manual page of "core(5)".  GDB also has a new command: "set use-coredump-filter on|off".  It allows to set whether GDB will read the content of the /proc/PID/coredump_filter file when generating a corefile.

  * GDB's "info os cpus" command on GNU/Linux can now display information on the cpus/cores on the system.

  * GDB has two new commands: "set serial parity odd|even|none" and "show serial parity".  These allows to set or show parity for the remote serial I/O.

Cheers
  Nick

April 19, 2015 04:22 PM

April 17, 2015

FSF Blogs

Latest TPP leak shows systemic threat to software freedom

On March 25th, 2015, Wikileaks released a leaked chapter of the ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the multinational trade agreement that is being developed through a series of secret negotiations and aims to create a host of new restrictions. We here at the FSF have been fighting against TPP for years, as it represents the threat of a world dominated by DRM, software patents, and perpetual copyright.

The latest leaked chapter on investments lays out changes to a system of supra-national courts known extrajudicial investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) tribunals. For years, these courts have enabled large companies to sue democratically-elected governments over policies that these corporations oppose. For example, Big Tobacco has used the system to block or obstruct health laws intended to reduce smoking in countries around the world.

While all of this is bad news in general, one provision in the leaked document presents a particular threat to software freedom. Holders of copyright, patent, and other proprietary interests are now included in the definition of "investor." Given the destructive nature of these provisions, the fact that proprietary developers could use them to interfere with local government protections of users' rights is cause for alarm.

But the damage doesn't stop there. The leaked provisions further clarify that these supranational courts would have jurisdiction over compliance with many of the worst provisions of TPP. That means that a proprietary developer could get a second shot at a case where they didn't like the initial outcome, potentially overturning a ruling on fair use, for example. Any country that tries to implement sane copyright and patent policy via their legislature or courts could be dragged into this sham tribunal to have that policy overturned.

The threat represented by TPP has loomed large on the horizon for many years. This latest leak demonstrates that the dangers we face increase as time goes by. Worse still, time may be running out in the U.S. to stop the madness as Obama and his friends in Congress seek to fast-track TPP approval. Key congressional leaders have now agreed on a deal to fast track the fast-tracking of TPP. Now is the time to fight back. Here is what you can do to help:

April 17, 2015 06:50 PM

GNU Hurd development blog

2015-04-10-releases

GNU Hurd 0.6, GNU Mach 1.5, GNU MIG 1.5 released. Details.

If you want to give the Hurd a try, you may easily do so with Debian GNU/Hurd.

Please read the FAQ. Bug reports should be sent to bug-hurd or filed on http://savannah.gnu.org/bugs/?group=hurd. Requests for assistance should be sent to help-hurd or filed on http://savannah.gnu.org/support/?group=hurd. You can also find us on the Freenode IRC network in the #hurd channel.


The GNU Hurd is the GNU project's replacement for the Unix kernel. It is a collection of servers that run on the Mach microkernel to implement file systems, network protocols, file access control, and other features that are implemented by the Unix kernel or similar kernels (such as Linux). More detailed.

GNU Mach is the microkernel upon which a GNU Hurd system is based. It provides an Inter Process Communication (IPC) mechanism that the Hurd uses to define interfaces for implementing in a distributed multi-server fashion the services a traditional operating system kernel provides. More detailed.

April 17, 2015 01:25 PM

April 15, 2015

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 17

Join the FSF and friends today, Friday, April 17, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

April 15, 2015 09:53 PM

April 14, 2015

Eitan Isaacson

(re)Introducing eSpeak.js

td;dr

Look! A flashy demo with buttons!

Background

A long time ago, we were investigating a way to expose text-to-speech functionality on the web. This was long before the Web Speech API was drafted, and it wasn’t yet clear what this kind of feature would look like. Alon Zakai stepped up, and proposed porting eSpeak to Javascript with Emscripten. This was a provocative idea: was our platform powerful enough to support speech synthesis purely in JS? Alon got back a few days later with a working demo, the answer was “yes”.

While the speak.js port was very impressive, it didn’t answer many of our practical needs. For example, the latency was not good enough for making a responsive UI, you could wait more than a couple of seconds to hear a short phrase. In addition, the longer the text you wanted to synthesize, the longer you needed to wait.

It proved a concept, but there were missing pieces we didn’t have four years ago. Today, we live in the future of 2011, and things that were theoretical then, are possible now (in the future).

asm.js

Today, Emscripten will compile C/C++ code into a subset of Javascript called asm.js. This subset is optimized on all current browsers, and allows performance to be about 2x native. That is really good. eSpeak is a pretty lightweight library already, the extra performance boost of asm.js makes speech instantaneous.

Transferable Objects

Passing data between a web worker and a parent process used to mean a lot of copying, since the worker doesn’t share memory with the parent process. But today, you can transfer ownership of ArrayBuffers with zero copying. When the web worker is ready to send audio data back to the calling process, it could do so while maintaining a single copy of the audio buffer.

Web Audio API

We have a slick, full featured Audio API today on the web. When speak.js came out in 2011, it used a prefixed method on an <audio> element to write PCM data to. Today, we have a proper API that enables us to take the audio data and send it through an elaborate pipeline of filters and mixers, or even send it into the ether with WebRTC.

Emscripten Got Fancy

This was my first time playing with it, so I am not sure what was available in 2011. But, if I have to guess, it was not as powerful and fun to work with. Emscripten’s new WebIDL support makes adding bindings extremely easy. You still get a chance to do some pointer arithmetic, but that’s supposed to be fun. Right?

So here is eSpeak.js!

I wanted to do a real API port, as opposed to simply porting a command line program that takes input and writes a WAV file. Why? two main reasons:

  1. eSpeak can progressively synthesize speech. If you provide a callback to espeak_Synth(), it will be called repeatedly with as many samples as you defined in the buffer size. It doesn’t matter how long the text is that you want synthesized, it will fill the buffer and return it to you immediately. This allows for a consistent low latency from the moment you call espeak_Synth(), until you could start playing audio.
  2. eSpeak supports events. If you use a callback, you get access to a list of events that provide a timestamp in the audio, and the type of event that occurs there, such as word or sentence boundaries.

And, of course, with all the recent-ish platform improvements above, I was really time for a fresh attempt.

Future Work

  • Break up the data files. Right now, eSpeak.js is over a 2MB download. That’s because I packaged all the eSpeak data files indiscriminately. There may be a few bits that are redundant. On the flip side you get all 99 voice/language combinations (that’s a good deal for 2MB, eh?). It would be cool to break it up to a few data files and allow the developer to choose which voices to bundle or, even better, just grab them on demand.
  • Make a demo of the speech events. It makes my head hurt to think about how to do something compelling. But it is a neat feature that should somehow be shown.
  • ScriptProcessorNode is apparently deprecated. This is going to need to be ported to an AudioWorker once that is widely implemented.

I’m done apologizing, here is the demo.


by Eitan at April 14, 2015 09:31 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in Ivrea, Italy

Richard Stallman will be speaking at the ConfSL 2.0 (2015-06-26--27). His speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Speech topic to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Ivrea.

April 14, 2015 04:44 PM

April 10, 2015

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 10

Join the FSF and friends today, Friday, April 10, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

April 10, 2015 02:30 PM

April 08, 2015

GNUtls

GnuTLS 3.4.0

Released GnuTLS 3.4.0 which is the first release of the new stable-next branch.

by Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos (nmav@gnutls.org) at April 08, 2015 12:00 AM

April 07, 2015

administration @ Savannah

new project submissions disabled

This post from 2011 is no longer applicable; nongnu submissions have been accepted again for some years, as detailed in later news items.
--
Very regrettably, due to a lack of volunteers, new non-GNU project
submissions are no longer accepted on Savannah, as of
9 November 2011. If active volunteers come forward, Savannah
will be re-opened.

See https://savannah.gnu.org/register/ for more information.

by Karl Berry at April 07, 2015 08:36 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Logiciels Libres et l'éducation" (Brest, France)

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Brest.

April 07, 2015 08:25 PM

Riccardo Mottola

IRC client TalkSoup 1.1 released

I am pleased to announce that after months of work a new release of GNUstep's IRC client, TalkSoup, is ready!
Being essentially abandoned the last released sources (alpha version)have been  imported some time ago in GAP with Andrew's consent. I also merged in some enhancements from the GIT repository code.

This new release was really started because the original code was not working at all anymore, it did not compile on certain platforms and elsewhere it crashed really often.

  • Very important Crash fixes due to Strings vs AttributedStrings
  • Native XCode port to Mac (both PPC and x86 do work), no GNUstep makefiles necessary
  • Memory leaks and fixes as recognized by clang's static analyzer
  • Tweaks to the user interface
  • Import and addition of the IGNORE plugin
  • Fixes to work on current GNUstep runtime and on MacOS
  • Preference fields send action on end editing, not enter
  • Install plugins locally inside Application resources with .bundle extension
  • Fixed myriads of crashes due to code using "id" instead of an explicit type and thus picking up the wrong methods
  • 64bit fixes with NSInteger/NSUInteger

Due to the change of plugin placement, you may need to delete your defaults.

Check more on it's GNUstep Appliction Project page, where you can download it or go to the savannah project page and learn how to check out the SVN sources.

Here the most classic and nostalgic setup: my iBook running Debian (without evil systemd) and the classic GNUstep theme and WindowMaker. Works fine!


Here instead on my other iBook, still running MacOS. Do you see some similarity? Although TalkSoup did run in the past on Mac, this is a native XCode build. Having it run on my ol' clamshell makes me feel cozy.


And something less common too, to prove the enhanced portability: GNU/Hurd on Debian, with the Sleek theme from GAP:

by Riccardo (noreply@blogger.com) at April 07, 2015 10:17 AM

April 05, 2015

GNU Remotecontrol

Newsletter – April 2015

THIS MONTH…..

  • TRENDS
  • EYE CATCHING
  • ANNUAL PLAN
  • DISCUSSIONS
  • EXISTING CODE
  • SECURITY
  • LASTLY
 TRENDSThe stuff going on in the big picture now

United States Electricity Price per KWH
Present and Past

January February Trend % Change
$0.138 $0.138 Same 0.00%

 

Year February Trend % Change % Since Difference
2005 $0.094 Same 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
2006 $0.108 Increase 14.89% 14.89% 14.89%
2007 $0.113 Increase 4.63% 20.21% 5.32%
2008 $0.116 Increase 2.65% 23.40% 3.19%
2009 $0.126 Increase 8.62% 34.04% 10.64%
2010 $0.123 Decrease -2.38% 30.85% -3.19%
2011 $0.125 Increase 1.63% 32.98% 2.13%
2012 $0.128 Increase 2.40% 36.17% 3.19%
2013 $0.129 Increase 0.78% 37.23% 1.06%
2014 $0.134 Increase 3.88% 42.55% 5.32%
2015 $0.138 Increase 2.99% 46.81% 4.26%

United Kingdom Utility Prices
Present and Past

London by night, seen from the International Space Station

EYE CATCHINGThe stuff that has caught our eye

Smart Grid – Consumer
A national energy efficiency measure has passed the United States Senate. The legislation associated with energy at large has become so important AEE has started selling a service to assist with tracking this type of legislation. Another article about how business worries about energy waste seems to explain the call for legislation and a market segment to supply energy legislation information. The bigger picture is the concern involving the difficulty to understanding the regional cost of energy. Variable pricing by region is not unusual. What is unusual is the difficulty to understand pricing variability in the information age. Legislation forcing energy efficiency speaks to either a supply problem or a rising cost problem, or both. Regardless, the cost of available energy in the near future is of concern.

Smart Grid – Producer
A recent article explaining the difficulty involved to monetize the distribution grid is well-constructed. The itemized cost of operational versus capitalized is endless to any large scale project. The costs are tangibly the same, regardless of how they are split on an accounting statement.

Smart Grid – Security
A recent article regarding energy management combined with security for businesses helps to understand why any business can see energy consistency as a real concern for doing business. Consistency involves purchasing at a price not experiencing radical increases.

ANNUAL PLAN

Status of our 2015 Plan

ModelViewController

  • We are in development stage.
  • We are approximately 80% finished with development.
  • We are prepared to immediately enter structured system testing, upon completion of development.
  • We maintain our position to release a subsequent version, 2.1, within six months of releasing v2.0, as we do not want to delay MVC from being available to the general public.

Translation Subsystem

  • We are complete with the development stage.
  • The system testing of this effort will occur during system testing of v2.0.

ANSI C

  • Further discussions with the members of the electronics industry.
  • Further work on the use-case for our firmware effort.

Talk to us with your comments and suggestions on our plan for the next year.

DISCUSSIONS

FREE HARDWARE DESIGNS
Stallman presents two articles on the concept of, “a design that permits users to use the design (i.e., fabricate hardware from it) and to copy and redistribute it, with or without changes.” The first article focuses on explaining the need for free hardware designs. The second article focuses on how to successfully accomplish free hardware designs. These articles match the position of our journey to design and build firmware for an internationally accepted residential network connected HVAC thermostat. This is an exciting time for GNU remotecontrol.

OTHER TYPES OF THERMOSTATS?
Many people have asked us about adding other types of thermostats to GNU remotecontrol. There are three questions that need to be answered before we can offer GNU remotecontrol support for any IP thermostat. These questions are:

  • How to CONNECT to it (NETWORK).
  • How to READ from it (CODE).
  • How to WRITE to it (CODE).

It is our hope to have dozens and dozens of thermostat types that work with GNU remotecontrol. Let us know if you designed or manufactured a device and you would like to test it with GNU remotecontrol.

EXISTING CODEThe stuff you may want to consider

BUGS
We have 0 new bugs and 0 fixed bugs since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

TASKS
We have 0 new tasks and 0 completed tasks since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

SECURITYThe stuff you REALLY want to consider

REMEMBER
GNU remotecontrol relies on OS file access restrictions, Apache authentication, MySQL authentication, and SSL encryption to secure your data. Talk to us you want to find out how you can further strengthen the security of your system, or you have suggestions for improving the security of our current system architecture.

LASTLY

Whatever you do…..don’t get beat up over your Energy Management strategy. GNU remotecontrol is here to help simplify your life, not make it more complicated. Talk to us if you are stuck or cannot figure out the best option for your GNU remotecontrol framework. The chances are the answer you need is something we have already worked through. We would be happy to help you by discussing your situation with you.

…..UNTIL NEXT MONTH!

Why the Affero GPL?

GNU Affero General Public License LOGO

GNU remotecontrol LOGO


by gnuremotecontrol at April 05, 2015 09:35 PM

April 03, 2015

gnuzilla @ Savannah

IceCat 31.6.0 release

GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0.
https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/

The user manual pages are at http://libreplanet.org/wiki/Group:IceCat/
You can contribute by joining the wiki and editing the manuals.

Source tarballs, binaries for generic GNU/Linux systems and translations are available at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuzilla/31.6.0/
GPG key ID:D7E04784 GNU IceCat releases
Fingerprint: A573 69A8 BABC 2542 B5A0 368C 3C76 EED7 D7E0 4784

Changes since v31.5.0

Other than applying the upstream fixes listed here
https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox-esr/
the only change for this release is the removal of the CNNIC root certificates, as explained at http://googleonlinesecurity.blogspot.com/2015/03/maintaining-digital-certificate-security.html
https://blog.mozilla.org/security/2015/03/23/revoking-trust-in-one-cnnic-intermediate-certificate

by Ruben Rodriguez at April 03, 2015 10:26 PM

FSF Blogs

Thousands of Spaniards leave Twitter for GNU social

This guest post was submitted by Daniel Dianes, a Spanish free software activist. Leer esto en español.

Unlike Twitter, which is controlled by a centralized authority, GNU social is a network of independent servers called nodes. Federation technology allows users to communicate between nodes, preserving the unified experience of traditional social media systems, and the free GNU social software allows anybody with an Internet connection to start their own public or private node and join the network. These administrators can even customize their nodes to suit the unique needs of their users.

Since GNU social is decentralized, it's harder for a company or government to censor content or shut down the network when they feel threatened by it. This is more than a hypothetical threat—it has been attempted multiple times by oppressive governments. Spreading out user data also makes bulk surveillance considerably more difficult, as there is no single database to crack into and copy.

Twitter user @Barbijaputa is popular in Spain, with more than 167,000 followers. She's known for criticizing the government or any other political parties or groups of power.

On January 14th, Twitter suspended @Barbijaputa's account after she participated in a conversation about sexually transmitted diseases. The next day, she created a profile on GNU social node Quitter.se and started posting. Her Twitter followers proved willing to follow her all the way to GNU social, and began joining existing nodes en masse and starting their own.

The growth was so explosive that the some of the existing GNU social nodes were unable to handle the traffic. On January 15th, a Quitter administrator posted this note:

"Due to high traffic, I need to stop the registrations for some time to get back in control. Has been a crazy day (15.01.15) on quitter.no and .is - -regards @knuthollund"

The node Quitter.es (Quitter Spain) was created to handle some of the extra people that overloaded existing GNU social instances like Quitter.no and Quitter.is. Quitter Spain now has 6,667 users and counting and Quitter.se reports 4,982 users, due in part to the incoming Spanish users.

GNU social is not the only federated social network challenging the centralized status quo. GNU MediaGoblin lets users publish images, videos, 3D models, and other files, Diaspora* provides a Facebook-like experience and pump.io is another option for microblogging. The Free Software Foundation runs a GNU social node at https://status.fsf.org.

Get started with GNU social today by picking from this list of nodes, and follow the Free Software Foundation at @fsf. Or try pump.io, and follow the FSF account @fsf there. Even if you don't have as many followers as @Barbijaputa, encourage them to follow you!

Daniel Dianes, FSF member #9171

April 03, 2015 07:50 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "A Free Digital Society" (Hangzhou, China)

There are many threats to freedom in the digital society. They include massive surveillance, censorship, digital handcuffs, nonfree software that controls users, and the War on Sharing. Other threats come from use of web services. Finally, we have no positive right to do anything in the Internet; every activity is precarious, and can continue only as long as companies are willing to cooperate with it.

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Speech venue:

Room 107, Building ChaoGuangBiao, Yuquan Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou / 中国 杭州 浙江大学玉泉校区 曹光彪大楼西楼107室

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Hangzhou.

April 03, 2015 01:20 PM

April 02, 2015

FSF Events

Joshua Gay - "Should Innovation Be Free?" (Cambridge, MA)

The FSF's licensing engineer & compliance manager, Joshua Gay, is going to be part of "An Innovation Series Debate: Should Innovation Be Free?":

It’s a debate that has gone on for as long as innovation itself. One side argues that innovation works best — and society is best served — if new ideas are allowed to flourish based solely on their merit, not someone’s ability to pay. The other side argues that paying innovators is only fair, that not paying them stems the flow of new products and services society sorely needs, and that the marketplace is the true measure of a new idea’s value.

Please note that you do not have to run nonfree software to register for this event: you can do so by registering at the venue, and paying in cash, which will also enable you to protect your anonymity.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Cambridge.

April 02, 2015 01:10 PM

March 31, 2015

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 3

Join the FSF and friends on Friday, April 3, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

March 31, 2015 06:55 PM

March 30, 2015

apl @ Savannah

GNU APL 1.5 Released

Hi,

I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.5 has been released.

This release contains:

  • some progress on parallel (multi-core) APL (still experimental)
  • performance counters for all built-in APL functions
  • the possibility to build GNU APL as a library (thanks to Dirk)

For details see https://github.com/dlaurie/lua-gnuapl

All bugs reported before March 28, 2015 were fixed.

The GNU APL project lives at: http://www.gnu.org/software/apl
and can be downloaded from: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/apl/ or any GNU mirror.

Bug reports and other suggestions are welcome at bug-apl@gnu.org.

Have fun!

Dr. Jürgen Sauermann
Author and Maintainer of GNU APL

by Jürgen Sauermann at March 30, 2015 01:45 PM

GNUCash News

GNUtls

March 29, 2015

GNUtls

March 27, 2015

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in Akron, OH

Richard Stallman will be speaking at Kent State University. His speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Speech topic to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Akron.

March 27, 2015 12:00 PM

March 26, 2015

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Free as in Freedom" (Mandalay, Myanmar)

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Mandalay.

March 26, 2015 06:05 PM

Richard Stallman - "Free as in Freedom" (Yangon, Myanmar)

This speech by Richard Stallman will accessible to all audience; attendance is gratis, and the general public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Yangon.

March 26, 2015 05:50 PM