Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

October 18, 2014

unifont @ Savannah

Unifont 7.0.05 Now Available

Unifont version 7.0.05 is now available for download at ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/unifont/unifont-7.0.05/.

Unifont is part of the GNU Project. It is a dual-width font,
with TrueType and other versions created from an underlying pixel
map. Glyphs are composed on either an 8-by-16 pixel grid or
a 16-by-16 pixel grid. Its goal is to provide a low-resolution font that covers all of Unicode's Basic Multilingual Plane, Plane 0.

This version includes over 5,400 glyphs in the Unicode Supplemental Multilingual Plane (Plane 1), in addition to complete coverage of the Basic Multilingual Plane and several scripts in Michael Everson's ConScript Unicode Registry (CSUR).

Further details are available at https://savannah.gnu.org/projects/unifont/ and at http://unifoundry.com/unifont.html.

Paul Hardy

by Paul Hardy at October 18, 2014 04:40 AM

October 17, 2014

teximpatient @ Savannah

Chinese translation of TeX for the Impatient

Zou Hu (thank you!) has completed a Chinese translation of TFTI (starting from earlier work by others). The sources are available from https://bitbucket.org/zohooo/impatient and a PDF is at http://zoho.is-programmer.com/user_files/zoho/epics/tex-impatient-cn.pdf ...

by Karl Berry at October 17, 2014 10:36 PM

FSF Blogs

Recap of Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: October 17

In today's Friday Free Software Directory (FSD) IRC Meeting we approved updates to several entries; we added a new category, System-administration/virtualization; and we also sent emails to the maintainers of two different programs asking them if, in addition to publishing their source code, they would consider making it free software. We also added a new entry that I am looking forward to trying out this weekend:

  • tocc, a tag-based file management system that allows you to tag/classify any file in your file system. It is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL version 3 or (at your option) any later version.

In addition to all this good work, we also also had some discussions related to Respects Your Freedom computer hardware certification, which makes me think that we should make RYF a theme for an upcoming meeting!

You can join in our discussions and help improve the Free Software Directory every Friday! Find out how to attend the Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetings by checking our blog or by subscribing to the RSS feed.

October 17, 2014 10:03 PM

FSF News

The Free Software Foundation opens nominations for the 17th annual Free Software Awards

Award for the Advancement of Free Software

The Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software is presented annually by FSF president Richard Stallman to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

Individuals who describe their projects as "open" instead of "free" are eligible nonetheless, provided the software is in fact free/libre.

Last year, Matthew Garrett was recognized with the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for his work to keep "Secure Boot" free software compatible, as well as his other work to make sure that so-called security measures do not come at the expense of user freedom. Garrett joined a prestigious list of previous winners including Dr. Fernando Perez, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Rob Savoye, John Gilmore, Wietse Venema, Harald Welte, Ted Ts'o, Andrew Tridgell, Theo de Raadt, Alan Cox, Larry Lessig, Guido van Rossum, Brian Paul, Miguel de Icaza, and Larry Wall.

Award for Projects of Social Benefit

Nominations are also open for the 2014 Award for Projects of Social Benefit.

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to the project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life.

We look to recognize projects or teams that encourage people to cooperate in freedom to accomplish social tasks. A long-term commitment to one's project (or the potential for a long-term commitment) is crucial to this end.

This award stresses the use of free software in the service of humanity. We have deliberately chosen this broad criterion so that many different areas of activity can be considered. However, one area that is not included is that of free software itself. Projects with a primary goal of promoting or advancing free software are not eligible for this award (we honor individuals working on those projects with our annual Award for the Advancement of Free Software).

We will consider any project or team that uses free software or its philosophy to address a goal important to society. To qualify, a project must use free software, produce free documentation, or use the idea of free software as defined in the Free Software Definition. Projects that promote or depend on the use of non-free software are not eligible for this award. Commercial projects are not excluded, but commercial success is not our scale for judging projects.

Last year, the GNOME Foundation's Outreach Program for Women (OPW) received the award, in recognition of its work to involve women (cis and trans) and genderqueer people in free software development. OPW's work benefits society more broadly, addressing gender discrimination by empowering women to develop leadership and development skills in a society which runs on technology. OPW does this critical work using the ideals and collaborative culture of the free software movement.

Other previous winners have included OpenMRS, GNU Health, Tor, the Internet Archive, Creative Commons, Groklaw, the Sahana project, and Wikipedia.

Eligibility

In the case of both awards, previous winners are not eligible for nomination, but renomination of other previous nominees is encouraged. Only individuals are eligible for nomination for the Advancement of Free Software Award (not projects), and only projects can be nominated for the Social Benefit Award (not individuals). For a list of previous winners, please visit https://www.fsf.org/awards.

Current FSF staff and board members, as well as award committee members, are not eligible.

The tentative award committee members are: Marina Zhurakhinskaya, Matthew Garrett, Rob Savoye, Wietse Venema, Richard Stallman, Suresh Ramasubramanian, Vernor Vinge, Hong Feng, Fernanda G. Weiden, Harald Welte, Vernor Vinge, Jonas Oberg, and Yukihiro Matsumoto.

Instructions

After reviewing the eligibility rules above, please send your nominations to award-nominations@gnu.org, on or before Sunday, November 16th, 2014 at 23:59 UTC. Please submit nominations in the following format:

  • In the email message subject line, either put the name of the person you are nominating for the Award for Advancement of Free Software, or put the name of the project for the Award for Projects of Social Benefit.

  • Please include, in the body of your message, an explanation (forty lines or less) of the work done and why you think it is especially important to the advancement of software freedom or how it benefits society, respectively.

  • Please state, in the body of your message, where to find the materials (e.g., software, manuals, or writing) which your nomination is based on.

Information about the previous awards can be found at https://www.fsf.org/awards. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony at the LibrePlanet conference, March 21-22 2015, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

October 17, 2014 05:05 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Free Software: The Basis for Freedom in Computing" (London, United Kingdom)

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is free of charge, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around London.

Start time and room number to be determined.

October 17, 2014 02:51 PM

October 16, 2014

freedink @ Savannah

New FreeDink DFArc frontend 3.12 release

Here's a new release of DFArc, a frontend to run the GNU FreeDink game and manage its numerous add-on adventures or D-Mods :)
http://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/freedink/dfarc-3.12.tar.gz

- DFArc now launches Dink and Dinkedit asynchronously, so you can run the editor even when the game is running.

- Improve extract & package performance.

- Fix infrequent off-by-1-pixel bug in logo animation.

- New Serbian, Catalan, Turkish, Esperanto, Brazilian Portuguese and Hungarian translations, as well as translations updates.

- Upgrade to wxWidgets 3.0.

About GNU FreeDink:

Dink Smallwood is an adventure/role-playing game, similar to Zelda, made by RTsoft. Besides twisted humor, it includes the actual game editor, allowing players to create hundreds of new adventures called Dink Modules or D-Mods for short.

GNU FreeDink is a new and portable version of the game engine, which runs the original game as well as its D-Mods, with close
compatibility, under multiple platforms.

DFArc is an integrated frontend, .dmod installer and .dmod archiver for the Dink Smallwood game engine.

by Sylvain Beucler at October 16, 2014 09:54 PM

FSF News

Matthew Garrett joins Free Software Foundation board of directors

Matthew Garrett

He becomes the eighth director on the FSF's board. The full list of their names and biographies can be found at http://www.fsf.org/about/staff-and-board.

"Matthew Garrett is a truly committed defender of users' freedom. The FSF is fortunate to have him on the board of directors," said FSF president Richard M. Stallman.

A developer specializing in the interactions between operating system kernels, platform firmware and system security, much of Garrett's work has focused on mechanisms for avoiding the oft-suggested tradeoff between user security and user freedom, ensuring that users have ultimate control over which software their devices will and will not run.

FSF executive director John Sullivan said, "Matthew has generously donated his time and expertise to advise the FSF on many issues in recent years, especially Restricted Boot and other disconcerting trends at the intersection of hardware and proprietary software distribution. His willingness to increase his involvement in FSF technical and policy leadership is fantastic news for our members and supporters."

Earlier this year, Garrett won the Free Software Foundation Award for the Advancement of Free Software. He holds a PhD in genetics from the University of Cambridge, and presents frequently around the world on the topic of free software in wider society.

On accepting the invitation to join the board, Garrett said, "It's been almost thirty years since the Free Software Foundation was founded, and in that time free software has become an indispensable part of computer use everywhere, creating an entire new generation of users and developers for whom free software has always been ubiquitous. Unfortunately, the number of threats to user freedom has also increased over that time. The FSF continues to campaign against attempts to restrict the rights of users and developers to be in ultimate control of the software that they use and the devices that they own, and I'm proud to be able to be a part of that."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

The above image is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 by nekonoir on Flickr.

October 16, 2014 09:39 PM

FSF Blogs

SSL, POODLE, and you

The flaw, which only affects the SSL 3.0 protocol, makes traffic vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks. We have dropped support for SSL 3.0 on fsf.org and gnu.org until a fix is released.

SSL 3.0 is nearly two decades old so most users will not be impacted by this change as we will continue to support modern encryption protocols. Older Web browsers without support for TLS 1.0 or later may have trouble connecting to our websites using a secure http connection (https).

A summary of CVE-2014-3566 can be found on the National Vulnerability Database.

The OpenSSL project has also produced a technical report(PDF) on the vulnerability.

October 16, 2014 07:15 PM

GNUtls

October 15, 2014

FSF Blogs

Registration is now open for LibrePlanet 2015: "Free Software Everywhere," March 21-22, 2015 in Cambridge, MA.

FSF members attend LibrePlanet gratis. Not a member? Join today to register gratis, or register at our non-member rate.

This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "Free Software Everywhere." Talks at this year's conference will touch on the many places and ways that free software is used around the world, as well as ways to make free software ubiquitous. At LibrePlanet 2015, we're once again teaming up with the Student Information Processing Board at MIT (SIPB), and together we're taking software freedom around the world, to outer space, and through all kinds of industries, governments, organizations, fields of study, and communities.

Want to speak at LibrePlanet?

Our Call for Sessions is still open. You can propose an individual session, panel, or workshop now through Sunday, November 2, 2014 at 23:59 UTC.

Have questions about what makes a good proposal? We're hosting an information session to answer any questions you have about submitting a proposal for LibrePlanet on Wednesday, October 22, 2014 from 16:00 - 18:00 UTC (12:00 - 14:00 EDT). Join us in the #libreplanet IRC channel on freenode. Don't use IRC? Email your questions to campaigns@fsf.org.

Need help getting to LibrePlanet?

Apply for a travel scholarship! We have a limited amount of funding to bring conference participants to LibrePlanet from all around the world. You can apply for a scholarship starting now -- the application deadline is November 30 at 23:59 UTC. Scholarship recipients will be notified in mid-December.

If you don't need a scholarship, you can help us ensure that LibrePlanet 2015 welcomes all people by making a contribution to the conference's scholarship fund now, or when you register for LibrePlanet. A donation of $50 covers one night in a shared Boston-area hotel room, but any amount helps.

Register for the conference now or become a member and then register at no cost, and don't forget to pick up a limited-edition, 100% certified organic cotton, union-made t-shirt while you're at it.

The energy and inspiration is palpable at LibrePlanet. Whether it's rubbing elbows with a maintainer you admire, learning about a new tool that can help you with your work, or rolling up your sleeves for the struggle against proprietary software, I'm telling you, you want to be in Cambridge, MA on March 21-22, 2015 for this year's LibrePlanet.

October 15, 2014 09:36 PM

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: October 17

Join the FSF and friends on Friday, October 17, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.


Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.


While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!


If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

October 15, 2014 07:12 PM

autoconf-archive @ Savannah

Noteworthy changes in release 2014.10.15

A brand-new Github mirror of the Archive's Git repository is available at <https://github.com/peti/autoconf-archive>. That project allows developers to submit patches as Pull Requests instead of having to go through Savannah's patch tracker.

The Archive no longer creates release tarballs compressed with gzip and bzip2; only tarballs compressed with xz and lzip are distributed.

AX_LIB_POSTGRESQL: substitute CPPFLAGS rather than CFLAGS.

AX_GCC_ARCHFLAG: Rewrite x86 support <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/?8514> and extend Clang support <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8515>.

AX_GCC_VAR_ATTRIBUTE: support the init_priority attribute.

AX_PERL_MODULE_VERSION: fix a misspelled variable name. Other unfixed issues remain. See <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8507>.

AX_BOOST_PYTHON: several issue have beeen fixed. Further details can be found at <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8540>.

AX_HAVE_QT: Only check $PATH and qmake for Qt variables. The old logic for detecting Qt without $PATH or qmake was never very reliable and the last change to this macro broke it entirely. If the Qt variables cannot be found via $PATH and qmake, then it would be best to manually define them in the makefile.

AX_TLS: fix quoting problem.

AX_F90_LIBRARY: several bug fixes and improvements. Further details are at <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/?8500>.

AX_LUA: fix initialization of ac_cv_header_lua_h. Further details are at <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/?8505>.

AX_AT_CHECK_PATTERN: executes a test similar to AT_CHECK(), except that stdout and stderr are awk regular expressions. Further details can be found at <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/?8492>.

AX_OPENMP: prevent false negative due to -Wunused-variable.

AX_COMPILER_VENDOR: improve detection of the CRAY compiler.

AX_ENABLE_BUILDDIR: support absolute paths.

AX_HAVE_QT: auto-detect Qt 5 by querying $PATH and qmake. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8486>.

AX_CHECK_ENABLE_DEBUG: add an --enable-debug option which defines an ENABLE_DEBUG cpp variable if set. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8452>.

AX_CODE_COVERAGE: new macro which contains all the necessary logic and Makefile rules for instrumenting a project with code coverage using lcov. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8451>.

AX_LIB_HDF5: don't overwrite the CPPFLAGS variable. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8449>.

AX_BOOST_BASE: fix for x32 systems. This subject probably needs more attention, though. See <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8433>.

AX_BERKELEY_DB(_CXX): add --with-libdb option so that this macros works on OSX with home-brew installed version of BDB. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8416>.

AX_CXX_HAVE_PLACEHOLDERS: check if std::placeholders is defined in <functional>. Submitted it <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8414>.

AX_LIB_HDF5: add support for recognizing HDF5 built with ccache. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8450>.

AX_CC_MAXOPT: Improve CPUID identification patterns as mentioned in patch #8514. Add ICC options added in version 11.0 (which deprecates older -xX style options). Add support for latest Intel performance processors (see #8514 for details). See <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8522>.

AX_EXECINFO: new macro to test execinfo size type. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8525>.

AX_CXX_VAR_PRETTYFUNC: new macro to determine the function name.

AX_CC_MAXOPT: default to -O2 for MSVC instead of -O3.

AX_CXX_HAVE_REFERENCE_WRAPPER, AX_CXX_HAVE_BAD_FUNCTION_CALL, AX_CXX_HAVE_BIND, AX_CXX_HAVE_BIT_AND, AX_CXX_HAVE_BIT_OR, AX_CXX_HAVE_BIT_XOR, AX_CXX_HAVE_CREF, AX_CXX_HAVE_FUNCTION, AX_CXX_HAVE_HASH, AX_CXX_HAVE_IS_BIND_EXPRESSION, AX_CXX_HAVE_IS_PLACEHOLDER, AX_CXX_HAVE_MEM_FN, AX_CXX_HAVE_REF: remove dependency on AX_CXX_NAMESPACES.

AX_BOOST_BASE has been extended to recognize ppc64le as a lib64 architecture. Submitted in <https://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8473>.

AX_PROG_FLEX has been extended to support OpenBSD.

AX_COUNT_CPUS has been extended to support Win32 (and Win64). Further details are at <http://savannah.gnu.org/patch/index.php?8381>.

by Peter Simons at October 15, 2014 03:22 PM

New Autoconf Archive mirror at available github.com

There is now a brand-new mirror of the GNU Autoconf Archive's Git repository available at https://github.com/peti/autoconf-archive that those who enjoy this sort of thing can use to submit patches to the Archive by means of a Pull Request instead of going through Savannah's patch tracker.

Happy forking!

by Peter Simons at October 15, 2014 01:41 PM

October 14, 2014

FSF Blogs

For Ada Lovelace Day, highlighting FSF sysadmin Lisa Maginnis

The holiday is named after a 19th-century English mathematician who is considered by many to be the first programmer. Though generations passed before her contribution was fully acknowledged, she was a pioneer both as a scientist and as a challenger of rigid gender roles. For this Ada Lovelace Day, we're profiling Lisa Maginnis, who is the FSF's senior systems administrator.

As the leader of the technical team, Lisa is responsible for choosing, configuring, and maintaining the FSF's office computers and servers. She uses extensive knowledge of hardware, networking, and electrical engineering to maintain a complex array of all-free software. An alert system sends text messages to her OpenMoko if servers have problems, and she's no stranger to urgent after-hours trips to the office to get something back online.

Since the FSF is the organizational sponsor of the GNU Project, Lisa also administers https://gnu.org and various GNU development repositories. GNU is a central piece in the free software world, and Lisa plays a larger role in keeping it running than many people know.

Lisa Maginnis

Lisa's life as a hacker started when she was thirteen, when her mother tried to teach her C programming from a book. Frustrated by her inability to compile the first exercise on Windows 95, she started exploring the Internet and discovered GCC and Slackware GNU/Linux. What followed was multiple weeks of Lisa downloading Slackware over her 56k Internet connection and teaching herself how to install it. By the end, she had not only successfully compiled and run the book's first exercise, but discovered free software and left Windows for good.

Self-directed and ambitious, Lisa dropped out of college when her professors refused to let her use free software tools for her projects. She put to rest any doubts about her decision when she helped found two companies, and then settled at the FSF.

Lisa is not just an enthusiast, but a deep believer in the value and importance of free software. Along with the need for freedom, she also believes that free software is important to avoid duplication of proprietary work, and to help developers "stand on the shoulders of giants."

When she's not working at the FSF, Lisa finds the time to maintain OpenCashier, a free software point of sale system. She's also contributed to a medical records system called OpenEMR, and now writes patches for software used by the FSF, like CiviCRM.

Lisa and a gnu handing out printouts of the FSF's 2013 Holiday Giving Guide in front of an Apple store.

As an expert in free software and in computer hardware, Lisa also advises the FSF's campaigns and licensing teams on technical issues -- it's common for her to review technically complex writings before they are sent out. She even participates actively in campaigns and attends conferences to promote the FSF.

Lisa combines technical talent and skill with a love of computer user freedom. As a self-taught system administrator with a commitment to freedom, her career has not been free of challenges, but she's turned each struggle into an opportunity and climbed to an influential position. She's a cornerstone of the FSF and an important resource for the GNU Project. Thank you, Lisa for your contribution to free software.

You can find Lisa on Freenode IRC as nully in the #fsf or #gnu channels. The FSF is currently looking for another system administrator, so if you've got the chops, you can join her team!

To read more about more women in free software, check out our previous Ada Lovelace Day posts:

October 14, 2014 10:35 PM

GNUCash News

October 13, 2014

GNUtls

GnuTLS 3.3.9, 3.2.19, and 3.1.17

Released GnuTLS 3.3.9, 3.2.19, and 3.1.17, which are bug-fix releases on the current and old stable branches respectively. The GnuTLS branch 3.3.x is the new stable branch.

by Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos (nmav@gnutls.org) at October 13, 2014 12:00 AM

October 12, 2014

Riccardo Mottola

Pantomime 1.2.2 release

Did you want to use GNUMail on NetBSD and were not even able to compile it? Do you run 64bit and had problems with GNUMail ?

I am pleased to announce a new, maintenance release of Pantomime.

Due to the inactivity of CollaborationWorld and Ludovic, we(*) decided to import the sources in gnustep-nonfsf at gna.org.



The download is at:
http://download.gna.org/gnustep-nonfsf/Pantomime-1.2.2.tar.gz

This release contains updates and some important, long-needed fixes:
* new res_init code for NetBSD which allows finally, after years, to run GNUMail on NetBSD!
* enhanced portability to FreeBSD and OpenBSD
* improved packaging hints in the makefiles
* port to MacOS reinstantiated (10.3/10.4 tested)
* extended 64bit fixes, including NSInteger/NSUInteger transitions were appropriate
* enhanced crash catching, so that debugging is eased in the future
* memory leaks fixed

by Riccardo (noreply@blogger.com) at October 12, 2014 08:56 PM

gsrc @ Savannah

Release of GSRC 2014.10.11

I'm happy to announce the 2014.10.11 release of GSRC, the GNU Source Release Collection. GSRC is a convenient means to fetch, build and install the latest GNU software from source via a BSD Ports-like system.

Installing a package is as simple as

$ make -C gnu/hello install

You can find more information and the documentation at the GSRC website:
http://www.gnu.org/software/gsrc

This release is a snapshot of the state of released GNU software at this time. You can download this release at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsrc or, you can download it from the nearest mirror at
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/gsrc/

Of course, to stay up-to-date with the latest package releases
in-between releases of GSRC, you may choose instead to checkout the bzr repository:

$ bzr checkout bzr://bzr.savannah.gnu.org/gsrc/trunk/ gsrc

And keep up-to-date with the latest releases:

$ bzr update

If you encounter any problems with a build script, please let me know at bug-gsrc@gnu.org.

NEWS

  • Changes to the GSRC system
    • Bugfix: Uninstallation of packages without info files. GSRC will no longer try to remove info files if they aren't installed. This would prevent the uninstallation procedure from completing.
    • Bugfix: Trailing whitespace from relevant package metadata is stripped. Trailing whitespace on the GARNAME, GARPROFILE, and GARVERSION variables is explicitly stripped to prevent bugs when the shell tries to operate on path names derived from some combination of their values.
  • Changes in GSRC packages
    • 2 packages have been added to GSRC since the last release
    • 49 packages have been updated since the last release
    • Coverage statistics (Note: the totals include packages that will not be implemented in GSRC, such as retired packages, which are counted as completed. Broken builds are counted as incomplete. Some packages have not yet made any releases, which are also counted as incomplete. See TODO for more information.)
      • GNU packages [424/473] [89%]
      • GNOME packages
        • Core [15/116] [12%]
        • Apps [1/44] [2%]
      • GNUstep packages [22/28] [78%]
    • New packages (most recent version given)
      • datamash (1.0.5)
      • direvent (5.0)
    • Updated packages (most recent version given)
      • apl (1.4)
      • bash (4.3-30)
      • chess (6.1.2)
      • coreutils (8.23)
      • cssc (1.4.0)
      • datamash (1.0.6)
      • ddrescue (1.19)
      • denemo (1.1.8)
      • easejs (0.2.4)
      • emms (4.0)
      • freeipmi (1.4.5)
      • gcc (4.9.1)
      • gcl (2.6.11)
      • gdb (7.8)
      • gettext (0.19.2)
      • gforth (0.7.3)
      • global (6.3.2)
      • glpk (4.55)
      • gnubg (1.03.001)
      • gnucash (2.6.4)
      • gnudos (1.7)
      • gnupg (2.0.26)
      • gnutls (3.3.8)
      • gss (1.0.3)
      • gtypist (2.9.5)
      • guile-ncurses (1.5)
      • help2man (1.46.3)
      • libc (2.20)
      • libgcrypt (1.6.2)
      • libidn (1.29)
      • librejs (6.0.1)
      • libtasn1 (4.2)
      • libunistring (0.9.4)
      • lightning (2.0.5)
      • lilypond (2.19.1)
      • linux-libre (3.16)
      • make (4.1)
      • mdk (1.2.8)
      • mediagoblin (0.7.1)
      • nano (2.3.6)
      • ocrad (0.24)
      • octave (3.8.2)
      • parallel (20140922)
      • parted (3.2)
      • pspp (0.8.4)
      • rcs (5.9.3)
      • swbis (1.12)
      • tar (1.28)
      • ucommon (6.1.11)

by Brandon Invergo at October 12, 2014 12:16 PM

GNUCash News

October 11, 2014

guix @ Savannah

Guix at the 2014 GNU Hackers Meeting

The Guix talk of this summer's GNU Hackers Meeting is now available on-line.

It gives an introduction to Guix from a user's viewpoint, and covers topics such as features for GNU maintainers, programming interfaces, declarative operating system configuration, status of the GNU/Hurd port, and the new Emacs and Web interfaces---with a bunch of demos.

Do not miss other fine talks from the GHM. Many thanks to everyone who took care of the video recordings.

About GNU Guix

GNU Guix is the functional package manager for the GNU system, and a distribution thereof.

In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. It also offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, with Guile Scheme programming interfaces.

At this stage the distribution can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el.

by Ludovic Courtès at October 11, 2014 09:56 AM

October 10, 2014

FSF Blogs

Recap of Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: October 10

Today's Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meeting once again comes after a very active week of users updating and adding new entries to the Directory. We were delighted to be joined by Ruben Rodriguez, the Trisquel GNU/Linux project leader and recently became the GNU IceCat maintainer. With Ruben's help, we came-up with a strategy adding all of the GNU IceCat extensions to the Directory that are listed on the IceCat homepage as well as from the Trisquel project's web site. We then had a short strategy meeting to figure out how to deal with the 101 separate utilities that are all packaged as part of the GNU coreutils package. We decided that each program should not get its own page, but instead we will list them on a Collection. So while this didn't leave us much time to add too many new entries to the Directory today, we did a great job of coming-up with a coordinated strategy for adding hundreds of new programs to the directory in coming weeks!

Find out how you can be part of the conversation and fun at our Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetings by checking our blog or by subscribing to the RSS feed.

October 10, 2014 10:06 PM

GNUCash News

October 09, 2014

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: October 10

Join the FSF and friends on Friday, October 10, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.


Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.


While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!


If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

October 09, 2014 07:11 PM

October 08, 2014

Eitan Isaacson

AMO with colors removed

An understated feature in desktop Firefox is the option to suppress the text and background colors that content authors choose for us, and instead go with the plain old black on white with a smattering of blue and purple links. In other words, 1994.

Why is this feature great? Because it hands control back to the user and allows people with visual impairments to tweak things just enough to make the web readable.

Somebody once asked on the #accessibility IRC channel why they can’t turn off content colors in Firefox for Android. So it seemed like a good idea to re-introduce that option in the form of an extension. There are a few color related addons in AMO, but I just submitted another one, and you could get it here. This is what the toggle option looks like:

Remove colors option in tools menu

Remove colors option in tools menu

Since the color attribute was introduced, the web has evolved a lot. We really can’t go back to the, naive, monochrome days of the 90s. Many sites use background images and colors in novel ways, and use backgrounds to portray important information. Sometimes disabling page colors will really break things. So once you remove colors from AMO, you get:

AMO with colors removed

Okayish, eh?

As you can see, it isn’t perfect, but it does make the text more readable to some. Having a menu item that doesn’t take too much digging to find will hopfully help folks go back and forth between the two modes and gt the best out of both worlds.


by Eitan at October 08, 2014 11:13 PM

October 06, 2014

FSF Events

GNOME Boston Summit 2014

Richard Stallman will be delivering an address on Saturday at 11:30am.

October 06, 2014 04:37 PM

October 05, 2014

make @ Savannah

GNU Make 4.1 released!

The next stable version of GNU make, version 4.1, has been released and is available for download from http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/make/

This release consists mainly of bug fixes.

Please see the NEWS file that comes with the GNU make distribution for details on user-visible changes.

by Paul D. Smith at October 05, 2014 10:48 PM

GNU Remotecontrol

Newsletter – October 2014

THIS MONTH…..
-TRENDS
-EYE CATCHING
-ANNUAL PLAN
-DISCUSSIONS
-EXISTING CODE
-SECURITY
-LASTLY

-TRENDS
The stuff going on in the big picture now…..

United States Electricity Price per KWH
Current and Past

July August Trend % Change
$0.143 $0.143 Same 0.00%

 

Year August Trend % Change % Since Difference
2004 $0.100 Same 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
2005 $0.105 Increase 5.00% 5.00% 5.00%
2006 $0.118 Increase 12.38% 18.00% 13.00%
2007 $0.121 Increase 2.54% 21.00% 3.00%
2008 $0.132 Increase 9.09% 32.00% 11.00%
2009 $0.130 Decrease -1.52% 30.00% -2.00%
2010 $0.133 Increase 2.31% 33.00% 3.00%
2011 $0.135 Increase 1.50% 35.00% 2.00%
2012 $0.133 Decrease -1.48% 33.00% -2.00%
2013 $0.137 Increase 3.01% 37.00% 4.00%
2014 $0.143 Increase 4.38% 43.00% 6.00%

United Kingdom Utility Prices
Current and Past

London by night, seen from the International Space Station

-EYE CATCHING
The stuff that has caught our eye…..

Demand Response

  • A new product line, from Ecobee, with an API.
  • An announcement, Echelon has sold their grid division. This bring the future of the LonWorks protocol into question.
  • A brief, recommending how to increase customer demand for Demand Response.
  • An article, identifying the Smart Grid as the next killer software application.

Smart Grid – Consumer

  • An article, reporting Amazon is working on launching a Smart Home device product line.
  • A conference, Demand Response World Forum 2014.
  • An article, reporting the United States Department of Energy has a final determination strengthening energy-efficiency for commercial building codes.
  • An article, reporting the United States Department of Energy has released a set of voluntary privacy recommendations for smart grid owners, operators, and third parties.
  • An article, reporting the impact of electric vehicle charging on the coming Smart Grid.
  • An article, reporting the United States Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is studying electricity market reforms.
  • An analysis, considering why consumers do not reduce their energy usage.
  • An article, describing the debate of owning customer energy data.
  • An article, discussing safety from hackers attacking Smart Home technologies.
  • An opinion, asserting the lack of federal oversight of Demand Response will hamper growth of Demand Response.
  • An article, discussing possibilities of Smart Grid mergers.
  • An article, considering low income Smart Grid customers.

Smart Grid – Producer

  • An article, reporting a federal appeals court upholds FERC Order 1000.
  • A website, the OpenADR Demand Response Research Center.
  • An article, discussing utilities needing to future-proof their mobile networks.
  • A report, finding electric transmission and distribution challenges include aging assets, equipment and technology investments, upgrading capacity verses lessening susceptibility, and power delivery system redesign plans.

Smart Grid – Security

  • A company, using proprietary technology to collect electric meter readings via small aircraft.
  • An effort, to develop and test a next generation energy management system. This effort does not speak of a security component.
  • An article, describing the need to secure the Smart Grid.
  • An article, addressing the current security status of the United States Smart Grid effort.
  • An article, describing the ten most dangerous Home Automation devices.
  • An opinion, recommending what utilities should do with their customer data.
  • A new Home Automation product line, having loads of interoperability, with little to no comprehensive security plan.

-ANNUAL PLAN
Status Update of our 2014 Plan…..

Demand Response

  • Further discussions with members of the electronics industry.
  • No other work since the April newsletter.

Unattended Server Side Automation

  • No other work since the April newsletter.

Power Line Communication

  • Further discussions with the members of the electronics industry.
  • No other work since the January newsletter.

Talk to us with your comments and suggestions on our plan for this year.

-DISCUSSIONS
The stuff we are talking about now…..

FSF INTERVIEW
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) interviewed the GNU remotecontrol team. GNU remotecontrol is a member of the Free Software Foundation. The article is a comprehensiveness then-to-now writing, in combination with where the software project will most likely go in the future.

FIVE YEAR HOME EFFICIENCY EXPERIMENT
The Tennessee Valley Authority has completed a study of combining various energy efficiency approaches. This study is the first time these approaches have been combined to this extent, for this long of a period. The outcome is the efficiency benefits are there to be gained, without exerting much expense. The question each person must decide is how long they are willing to wait for their payback period to arrive.

OTHER TYPES OF THERMOSTATS?
Many people have asked us about adding other types of thermostats to GNU remotecontrol. There are three questions that need to be answered before we can offer GNU remotecontrol support for any IP thermostat. These questions are:

  • How to CONNECT to it (NETWORK).
  • How to READ from it (CODE).
  • How to WRITE to it (CODE).

It is our hope to have dozens and dozens of thermostat types that work with GNU remotecontrol. Let us know if you designed or manufactured a device and you would like to test it with GNU remotecontrol.

-EXISTING CODE
The stuff you may want to consider…..

BUGS
We have 0 new bugs and 0 fixed bugs since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

TASKS
We have 1 new tasks and 0 completed tasks since our last Blog posting. Please review these changes and apply to your GNU remotecontrol installation, as appropriate.

-SECURITY
The stuff you REALLY want to consider…..

BLACK HAT USA 2014
Black Hat is the most technical and relevant global information security event series in the world. Their 2014 conference clearly demonstrates the electronics industry is not moving fast enough to secure Smart Home technologies. This problem is not only caused by the electronics industry. It is also caused by an end-user willingness to have functionality over security. The final result is often property theft or identity theft. The need for security of both the Smart Grid and the Smart Home cannot be overstated.

REMEMBER
GNU remotecontrol relies on OS file access restrictions, Apache authentication, MySQL authentication, and SSL encryption to secure your data. Talk to us you want to find out how you can further strengthen the security of your system, or you have suggestions for improving the security of our current system architecture.

-LASTLY
Whatever you do…..don’t get beat up over your Energy Management strategy. GNU remotecontrol is here to help simplify your life, not make it more complicated. Talk to us if you are stuck or cannot figure out the best option for your GNU remotecontrol framework. The chances are the answer you need is something we have already worked through. We would be happy to help you by discussing your situation with you.

…..UNTIL NEXT MONTH!

Why the Affero GPL?

GNU Affero General Public License LOGO

GNU remotecontrol LOGO


by gnuremotecontrol at October 05, 2014 06:56 PM

October 04, 2014

Lonely Cactus

On people with the name Stephen Gran

So I (Mike Gran) mentioned to a colleague the other day that my brother is Stephen Gran.

"Isn't there a Stephen Gran that does something for Debian," he said.

"I think so," I said. "I've run across that name before.... Yeah Debian Steve is #5 in the Google searches for Stephen Gran."

"But that's not your brother?," he asked

"Sadly, no. Looks like my brother is the #10 Stephen Gran, down here where it says 'suspects arrested'."

by Mike (noreply@blogger.com) at October 04, 2014 08:03 PM

health @ Savannah

GNU Health patchset 2.6.4 released

Dear community

GNU Health patchset 2.6.4 has been released !

Priority: High

Table of Contents

  • About GNU Health Patchsets
  • Summary of this patchset
  • Installation notes
  • List of Bugs

About GNU Health Patchsets

We provide "patchsets" to stable releases. Patchsets allow quick bug fixes and updates for production systems.

Patches and Patchsets maximize uptime for production systems, and keep your system updated, without the need to do a whole installation. Some of them, and thanks to the magic of Tryton can be applied to running system.

NOTE: Patchsets are applied on previously installed systems only. For new installations, download and install the whole tarball (ie, gnuhealth-2.6.4.tar.gz)

For more information about GNU Health patches and patchsets you can visit https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/GNU_Health/Patches_and_Patchsets

Summary of this patchset

  • Affected modules (excludes localization / typos) : health, health_calendar
  • health : Fix appointment institution link, to point now to the new Institution model.
  • health_calendar : Fix Health Professional Work Schedule wizard

Installation Notes

You must apply previous patchsets before installing this patchset. If your patchset level is 2.6.3, then just follow the general instructions. You can find the patchsets at GNU Health FTP site (ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/health/)

Follow the general instructions at https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/GNU_Health/Patches_and_Patchsets

Source the GNU Health profile (source $HOME/.gnuhealthrc) to update your environment

Update your database ( update=all )

List of bugs related to this patchset

#43347 Invalid assignment of institution in appointments ( https://savannah.gnu.org/bugs/index.php?43347 )
#43350 Institution field in Work Schedule still points to party ( https://savannah.gnu.org/bugs/index.php?43350 )

by Luis Falcon at October 04, 2014 06:37 PM

October 03, 2014

FSF Blogs

Recap of Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: October 3

Today's Friday Free Software Directory (FSD) IRC Meeting comes after a very active week of users updating and adding new entries to the Directory. User Mviinama made over 80 edits alone! And, I was happy to see that such productivity continued during our meeting today, as well.

Two new packages added today worth highlighting are:

  • Traccar, a Java server that displays map and other data from various GPS tracking devices. It is under the Apache 2.0 license.
  • Seafile, a server based filestore with clients for multiple different platforms. It serves as a replacement for SaaSS such as dropbox. The server is licensed under the Apache 2.0 license and clients
    are licensed GNU GPL version 3 (only).

In addition to adding new packages and updating many more, we also had a lively discussion about font licensing and about the MPL, and we brainstormed some ideas for new icons and other art to brighten up the pages on the Directory.

You too can join in our discussions and help improve the Directory: find out how to attend our Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetings by checking our blog or by subscribing to the RSS feed.

October 03, 2014 11:13 PM