Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

May 03, 2016

FSF News

Allies join Defective by Design for the tenth anniversary of the International Day Against DRM

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016 -- Today community groups, activist organizations, and businesses are taking part in the International Day Against DRM, celebrating ten years since the first global day of action in 2006. The groups are united in envisioning a world without Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), technology that polices what people can do with digital media by spying on them and compromising their computer security. As the largest anti-DRM event in the world, the International Day Against DRM is intended as a counterpoint to the pro-DRM message broadcast by powerful media and software companies. The Day is coordinated by Defective by Design, a campaign of the Free Software Foundation.

At the time of publication, community members and activists have organized eleven events in Mexico, Bangladesh, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, and the US. Fifteen organizations are participating, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Creative Commons, the Document Foundation (home of LibreOffice), and the Free Software Foundation sister organizations in India and Europe. Bookstores and publishers, including O'Reilly Media, are offering sales on DRM-free media

Today Defective by Design released a timeline recounting the first ten years of the International Day Against DRM. Community members are encouraged to continue the timeline by envisioning future victories against DRM on social media.

Zak Rogoff, campaigns manager for the Free Software Foundation said, "Giving its owners power over our cars, medical devices, phones, computers, and more, DRM opens a deep crack in our digital rights and freedoms. That crack will only get wider and more dangerous as our societies continue to interweave with technology. Governments and corporations steer the massive technosocial system that perpetuates DRM and makes it profitable, often steering it away from the best interests of the technology's actual users. Committed to a more ethical technological future, our movement pushes back. Today, looking back on ten years since the first International Day Against DRM, we have a lot of progress to celebrate, and we still have a lot of work to do."

Individuals can participate with a variety of online and in-person actions on dayagainstdrm.org, from DRM-free media purchases to gatherings. To be part of Defective by Design's year-round anti-DRM campaigns, supporters can join the low-volume action alerts email list, the DRM Elimination Crew discussion list and the #dbd IRC channel on Freenode. Media stores, activist organizations and other groups interested in participating in the International Day Against DRM in 2017 should join the email discussion list to get reminders and support when the event is near.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Media Contact

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1-617-542-5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

May 03, 2016 02:29 AM

April 29, 2016

FSF News

Hundreds explore ways to Fork the System with free software at LibrePlanet 2016

Edward Snowden on the screen talking with Daniel Kahn Gillmore at LibrePlanet 2016

Edward Snowden talks with Daniel Kahn Gillmor at LibrePlanet 2016.

At a ceremony on Saturday, March 21st, Free Software Foundation President Richard M. Stallman announced the winners of the FSF's annual Free Software Awards. Two awards were given: the Award for the Advancement of Free Software was presented to Werner Koch for his work on GNU Privacy Guard, the defacto tool for encrypted communication, and the Award for Projects of Social Benefit was presented to the Library Freedom Project, a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries.

Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler closed out the conference with "Companies, free software, and you," in which she urged free software developers to push their employers to allow them to retain copyleft on their code.

Karen Sandler speaking at LibrePlanet 2016

Software Freedom Conservancy Executive Director Karen Sandler closed out LibrePlanet 2016.

A video of the opening keynote conversation between Edward Snowden and Daniel Kahn Gillmor is available now at http://media.libreplanet.org/u/libreplanet/m/libreplanet-2016-the-last-lighthouse/. Videos of all the conference sessions, along with photographs from the conference, will soon be available on https://media.libreplanet.org, the conference's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that anyone can run.

LibrePlanet 2016 was produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

April 29, 2016 03:20 PM

April 28, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 29th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, April 29th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

April 28, 2016 08:20 PM

April 26, 2016

gzip @ Savannah

gzip-1.8 released [stable]

by Jim Meyering at April 26, 2016 09:28 PM

denemo @ Savannah

Version 2.0.8 is imminent, please test

Binaries (labelled 0.0.0) are at
http://denemo.org/~jjbenham/gub/uploads/?C=M;O=D
The new features are:

Copy and Paste
Applies to note/chord attributes
CtrlC, Ctrl-V work for these
Copied marking is highlighted
Selection changes color when copied
Improved Acoustic Feedback
Trill makes a short trill sound on entry
Copy attributes sounds
Improved Visual Feedback
Status bar notices are animated
Characters are highlighted in Lyric Verses
Directives are made more legible when cursor is on them
Cadenza Time
For un-metered music
Music can still display in “bars”
New Commands
Tuplet Positioning
Curved Tuplet Brackets
Cadenza on/off uses Cadenza Time, sets smaller note size, editable text
Notes without stems
Multi-line text annotation
Bold, Italic etc now apply to selection
A guard prevents accidental syntax collision
Updated Manual
More detail
Now indexed
Bug Fixes
Command Center search now reliable
Standalone Multi-line text with backslash editing
Pasting into measures that precede a time signature change

by Richard Shann at April 26, 2016 04:08 PM

April 25, 2016

remotecontrol @ Savannah

Release of GNU remotecontrol - Version 2.0

The GNU remotecontrol Team is proud to announce our first major upgrade release. The following changes comprise Version 2.0.

CHANGES:
-The code has been rewritten to adopt the Model-View-Controller software architectural pattern. This pattern eases code modification.

-Implemented a Data Abstraction Layer. This functionality mediates access between application and database, allowing implementations across different platforms and systems.

-A single configuration file. This simplicity eases installation effort and helps with diagnosing system performance problems.

-Added enhanced support for time zone offset and daylight savings time. MySQL Server Time Zone Support is used to identify time zone offset from UTC, in combination with input from the GUI web pages.

-Added enhanced management features for application user, thermostat device, thermostat group, and thermostat location.

-Added role-based security. This approach simplifies separating administrative accounts from user accounts.

-Added enhanced error reporting for code performance problems.

-A new Nagios monitoring check, check_forecast. This new check expands the monitoring capability of a HVAC energy system by complementing the existing check_thermostat and check_weather functionality with weather forecast information, to assist estimating future HVAC system performance.

SVN VERSION DIRECTORY:
svn checkout svn://svn.sv.gnu.org/remotecontrol/branches/Version2.0 remotecontrol-2.0

by Stephen H. Dawson at April 25, 2016 10:58 PM

FSF News

GNU releases ethical evaluations of code-hosting services

The completed evaluations can be viewed on the evaluation page, while the criteria page offers more information on the evaluation process, as well as the criteria themselves.

Repositories are used not only by software developers but also by software users, and they have a large impact on the free software community. The evaluations promote and honor good ethical practices on the part of repositories, and make it easy for users to find services that respect them.

Version 1.0 of the criteria ranks sites on a score from F (unacceptable) to A+ (extra credit). No site has yet received extra credit, but Savannah achieved an A grade. An F grade shows the service has not met even the minimum ethical standards expected for the hosting of a GNU package. GNU's Repo Criteria Discussion list is happy to offer assistance to repository-hosting organizations seeking to improve their service's score.

One service which has passed the criteria is GitLab. "We want to allow everyone to contribute to software. We recognize that many people have a need for free software to do this," said GitLab's CEO Sytse Sijbrandij, adding that "as a former developer myself, I think it is natural that you can contribute to the software you use to collaborate." Many repository sites require the user to run proprietary JavaScript to access their full functionality, but GitLab has addressed this by relicensing its JavaScript as free software.

Savannah, which has also passed these criteria, "host[s] projects for the sake of the ideals of freedom and community that the free software movement stands for," according to its Web site, which also makes clear that "[t]he space given to you on this server is given for the expressed purpose of advancing free software." Savannah is hosted by the FSF but run almost entirely by a dedicated team of volunteers.

Andrew Ferguson, a community member who played a leadership role in the evaluation project, said "More volunteers with coding ability are needed to aid the development of existing repository services to help them meet these criteria. All community members are encouraged to write the administrators of code-hosting services, to build awareness and a motivation to improve their ethical evaluations. GitHub has responded to some requests from the free software community and has recently updated its license chooser to include the GPLv3 license. However more community advocacy is required, as GitHub still fails to meet the criteria."

General discussion regarding the criteria or evaluations can be directed to the libreplanet-discuss mailing list. If you'd like to lend your help evaluating repositories, please join the repo-criteria-discuss list.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

April 25, 2016 07:55 PM

German Arias

First release of eiffel-iup

I’m glad to announce the first release of eiffel-iup. A wrapper that allow create graphical applications with Liberty Eiffel using the IUP toolkit. In this first release are available all the dialogues at IUP and all standard controls (except IupFlatButton). All controls has been tested, but not all its features. So, could be problems. But this is enough mature to create graphical interfaces. So let’s look at some screenshots of the examples that comes with this package. The image below show a simple editor with a tool bar that can be detached. Only one button works at that tool (the button to underline), the rest are just examples of buttons with predefined images at IUP stack.

eiffel-iup-1

The example number 5, show how use several predefined dialogues, as show the images below:

eiffel-iup-2

eiffel-iup-3

eiffel-iup-4

The same example show, in other tabs, the use of many other controls, like popups, combo box, sliders, calendars, spin box, splits and others:

eiffel-iup-5

eiffel-iup-6

Other example show how use a tree, an expander and a sbox:

eiffel-iup-7

To get an idea about how use this package, the image below show the code of a small app to display a dialog with a label and a button to close the app (you should insert the class IUP_INTERFACE):

my_example

You can download this first release here. So, let me know if you have problems, and wait for upcoming lessons on how to use eiffel-iup. Happy Hacking!


by Germán Arias at April 25, 2016 01:55 AM

April 24, 2016

guix @ Savannah

GNU Guix welcomes four students for GSoC

We are glad to announce that four students will join GNU Guix for the 2016 Google Summer of Code (GSoC):

All four projects sound exciting to us and we are happy to see progress on these fronts. Happy hacking!

About GNU Guix

GNU Guix is a transactional package manager for the GNU system. The Guix System Distribution or GuixSD is an advanced distribution of the GNU system that relies on GNU Guix and respects the user's freedom.

In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, except that packages are defined as native Guile modules, using extensions to the Scheme language. GuixSD offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management, and is highly customizable and hackable.

GuixSD can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el and armv7.

by Ludovic Courtès at April 24, 2016 07:45 PM

April 23, 2016

health @ Savannah

GNU Health Federation

Dear all

The upcoming 3.2 version will bring lots of new features, but today I want to concentrate in two:

  • My Gnu Health
  • GNU Health Federation

We could also give the new version codename GHINT (GNU Health is Not Tryton), as it really expands its functionality beyond the Tryton framework. Of course, Tryton is nice and we will still use it.

This approach exemplifies our philosophy in GNU Solidario, where Free Software and GNU Health represent a philosophy, and technology is just a way to deliver it.

My GNU Health

A mobile application with the functionality of Personal Health Record (PHR) and Patient Portal. MyGNUHealth empowers the person and makes her / him an active member in the health system.
From recording and transmitting the blood pressure or glucose level, to make the appointments or update the demographic information. All from the mobile device.

GNU Health Federation

The obsolescence of the Tryton synchronization engine led me to start the design a new model: a truly federated system. That is :

  • Decentralized
  • Autonomous
  • Heterogeneous
  • Scalable

Under this model GNU Health will integrate information from different data sources (not only from Tryton); each system can work autonomously (even in the event. of network failure), information will be shared across the nodes, and aggregated in a highly scalable model.

This new model on GNU Health 3.2 will combine the transactional / relational DB system (eg, PostgreSQL) with the big data, highly scalable NoSQL model (eg, MongoDB).

This new design brings the best of the two worlds: The transactional processes in a health institution (evaluations, stock management, prescriptions, hospitalizations, ... ) as well as the non-transactional information used by the health authorities (demographics, epidemiology, ...).

By the way, data and exchange standards (eg, HL7 FHIR) will be key, so the existing GNU Health FHIR server will play an even greater role.

Anyways, quite exciting news that I wanted to share with you.

Time to work !

Bests,
Luis

by Luis Falcon at April 23, 2016 09:27 PM

April 22, 2016

grep @ Savannah

grep-2.25 released [stable]

by Jim Meyering at April 22, 2016 05:16 AM

April 21, 2016

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20160422 ('PanamaPapers') released

GNU Parallel 20160422 ('PanamaPapers') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parallel/

Haiku of the month:

xapply too strict?
:::+
is just made for you
-- Ole Tange

New in this release:

  • :::+ and ::::+ work like ::: and :::: but links this input source to the previous input source in a --xapply fashion. Contrary to --xapply values do not wrap: The shortest input source determines the length.
  • --line-buffer --keep-order now outputs continuously from the oldest job still running. This is more what you would expect than the earlier behaviour where --keep-order had no effect with --line-buffer.
  • env_parallel supports tcsh, csh, pdksh. In fish it now supports arrays. In csh/tcsh it now supports variables, aliases, and arrays with no special chars. In pdksh it supports aliases, functions, variables, and arrays.
  • Function exporting on Mac OS X works around old Bash version.
  • Better CPU detection on OpenIndiana.
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

If you like GNU Parallel:

  • Give a demo at your local user group/team/colleagues
  • Post the intro videos on Reddit/Diaspora*/forums/blogs/ Identi.ca/Google+/Twitter/Facebook/Linkedin/mailing lists
  • Get the merchandise https://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/merchandise.html
  • Request or write a review for your favourite blog or magazine
  • Request or build a package for your favourite distribution (if it is not already there)
  • Invite me for your next conference

If you use GNU Parallel for research:

  • Please cite GNU Parallel in you publications (use --bibtex)

If GNU Parallel saves you money:

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at April 21, 2016 10:51 PM

FSF News

FSF Job Opportunity: Operations Assistant

This position works closely with FSF staff and management to ensure all administrative functions of the FSF run smoothly and efficiently, preserving our 4-star Charity Navigator rating and boosting all areas of our work.

The Operations Assistant is responsible for handling phone calls, managing office operations, and being a friendly face for visitors to our office at the center of Boston's Downtown Crossing. Examples of job responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • fulfilling orders for FSF merchandise and related bookkeeping,
  • blogging about merchandise-related news,
  • processing incoming donations,
  • coordinating volunteers,
  • updating our contact database,
  • organizing fundraising mailings, membership mailings, and similar communications,
  • assisting with local and special events, including our annual LibrePlanet conference,
  • assisting with website maintenance, and
  • looking after the office space.

This is a great opportunity for a team-oriented self-starter who thrives on multitasking, is calm under pressure, has an eye for detail, and wants to make a difference. The position must be worked from the Boston office, and the position must be able to lift small to medium-size packages (up to 50 pounds) on a regular basis. With our small staff of thirteen, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment.

Because our mission is worldwide, language skills and a demonstrated ability to interact with people across cultures and age groups will be highly valued. While the position does not require advanced computer skills, a willingness to learn and work with new software is a must. We use free software like CiviCRM, Plone, Emacs, and LibreOffice, all running on GNU/Linux.

The FSF is a growing organization and provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. Previous Operations Assistants have often gone on to hold other positions within the organization.

Benefits and salary

This job is a union position. The salary is fixed at $51,646/year and is non-negotiable. Other benefits include the following:

  • full family health coverage through Blue Cross/Blue Shield's HMO Blue program,
  • subsidized dental plan,
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually,
  • seventeen paid holidays annually,
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement,
  • 403(b) program through TIAA-CREF, and
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases (based on government guidelines).

Resumes and cover letters must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line, "Operations Assistant". Resumes should be attached in text, PDF, or OpenDocument. No Word documents, please. Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will be ignored.

Applications must be received by Friday, May 20, 2016.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

April 21, 2016 03:23 PM

April 20, 2016

pyconfigure @ Savannah

Release of GNU pyconfigure 0.2.3

I am pleased to announce the release of GNU pyconfigure 0.2.3.

GNU pyconfigure is a set of template files for Python developers to use
to easily implement the standard GNU configure/install process for their
packages. The standard GNU process generally consists of two familiar
steps:

$ ./configure --prefix=/usr/
$ make install

By using the templates provided by GNU pyconfigure, the Python developer
gains the power and flexibility of the time-tested, language-agnostic
GNU installation process, while the user or the software packager
encounters a familiar and convenient interface.

GNU pyconfigure is designed to work either alongside of or in place of
the Python 'distutils' module's setup.py script. Thus, if your project
already has a setup.py script, pyconfigure can simply wrap its
functionality, leveraging the work you have already done.

To learn more and to read the documentation, visit the website at:
http://www.gnu.org/software/pyconfigure

Here are the compressed sources and a GPG detached signature[*]:
pyconfigure/pyconfigure-0.2.3.tar.gz
pyconfigure/pyconfigure-0.2.3.tar.gz.sig

Here are the MD5 and SHA1 checksums:

8a64b3187cf2d43e3230d1ee68d607b5 pyconfigure-0.2.3.tar.gz
0590628eab986d8cf2755d93c9f71e0953e50516 pyconfigure-0.2.3.tar.gz

[*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the
.sig suffix) is intact. First, be sure to download both the .sig file
and the corresponding tarball. Then, run a command like this:

gpg --verify pyconfigure-0.2.3.tar.gz.sig

If that command fails because you don't have the required public key,
then run this command to import it:

gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys EB7AB74D

and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command.

This release was bootstrapped with the following tools:
Autoconf 2.69
Automake 1.15

NEWS

This is a bugfix release.

  • Uninstallation of scripts was fixed and uninstallation was made safer in general. A bug in uninstalling scripts via the Makefile has been fixed. Uninstallation via the Makefile was previously safe if the relevant targets and variables were used correctly, however it was possible to implement some Very Bad Ideas. It should be a lot more difficult to do that now.
  • Checking for python interpreters is more robust. Previously the macros could still be confused depending on whether the "python" executable points to "python2" or "python3". The correct version should be detected in all cases now.

by Brandon Invergo at April 20, 2016 05:40 PM

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 22nd

Join the FSF and friends Friday, April 22nd, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

April 20, 2016 03:10 PM

Gary Benson

Infinity client library

This past few weeks I’ve been working on an Infinity client library. This is what GDB will use to execute notes it finds. It’s early days, but it executed its first note this morning so I thought I’d put something together so people can see what I’m doing. Here’s how to try it out:

  1. Install elfutils libelf development stuff if you don’t have it already, the tlsdump example program needs it:
    sudo yum install elfutils-libelf-devel  # Fedora, RHEL, etc...
    sudo apt-get install libelf-dev         # Debian, Ubuntu, etc...
  2. Download and build the Infinity client library and example program:
    git clone -b libi8x-0.0.1 https://github.com/gbenson/libi8x.git libi8x-0.0.1
    cd libi8x-0.0.1
    ./autogen.sh
    ./configure --enable-logging --enable-debug
    make
  3. Check the tlsdump example program built:
    bash$ ls -l examples/tlsdump
    -rwxr-xr-x. 1 gary gary 5540 Apr 20 12:52 examples/tlsdump

    Yeah, there it is! (if it’s not there go back to step 0)

  4. Build a program with notes to run the example program against:
    gcc -o tests/ifact tests/ifact.S tests/main.c
  5. Run the program you just built:
    bash$ tests/ifact &
    [2] 8301
    Hello world I'm 8301
  6. Run the libi8x tlsdump example program with the test program’s PID as it’s argument:
    $ examples/tlsdump 8301
    0! = 1
    1! = 1
    2! = 2
    3! = 6
    4! = 24
    5! = 120
    6! = 720
    7! = 5040
    8! = 40320
    9! = 362880
    10! = 3628800
    11! = 39916800
    12! = 479001600

What just happened? The executable test/ifact you built contains a single Infinity note, test::factorial(i)i, the source for which is in tests/ifact.i8. The tlsdump example located the ifact executable, loaded test::factorial(i)i from it, and ran it a few times printing the result:

  err = i8x_ctx_get_funcref (ctx, "test", "factorial", "i", "i", &fr);
  if (err != I8X_OK)
    error_i8x (ctx, err);

  err = i8x_xctx_new (ctx, 512, &xctx);
  if (err != I8X_OK)
    error_i8x (ctx, err);

  for (int i = 0; i < 13; i++)
    {
      union i8x_value args[1], rets[1];

      args[0].i = i;
      err = i8x_xctx_call (xctx, fr, NULL, args, rets);
      if (err != I8X_OK)
	error_i8x (ctx, err);

      printf ("%d! = %d\n", i, rets[0].i);
    }

To see some debug output try this:

I8X_LOG=debug examples/tlsdump PID

Also try I8X_DEBUG=true in addition to I8X_LOG=debug to trace the bytecode as it executes.

by gbenson at April 20, 2016 02:21 PM

April 19, 2016

FSF Events

Roaming Teach-in for Digital Freedom (Washington, DC)

We'll distribute information about DRM in front of the office of the MPAA and RIAA, major industry groups that coordinate lobbying for laws that support DRM and unjust prosecution of those that circumvent it. Our last stop will be the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, to call attention to DRM's harm on libraries, and celebrate the possibility of a DRM-free future.

The goal of the teach-in is to use engaging materials get people thinking about the realities of DRM and excited about DRM-free media. Come to do whatever is best for your comfort level - you can hand out info, or take it to the next level and have educational conversations with passersby. Only a basic understanding of DRM issues is required -- we'll provide handouts and flyers, as well as a knowledgeshare session beforehand to practice the explaining DRM.

We'll gather afterwards at Austin Grill (750 E St NW) to talk about DRM activism and share snacks and drinks courtesy of the Free Software Foundation. If you can only come for the flyering, or only come for Austin Grill, you are still more than welcome. RSVP encouraged.

  • MEETING TIME: 5:45 PM, Tuesday, May 3
  • MEETING POINT: Pret A Manger restaurant on 17th & K street, right next to the Farragut North Metro Station.
  • PLAN:
    • 5:45 - 6:15 Sign-making, knowledge-share at Pret a Manger
    • 6:15 - 7:30 Teach-in at the MPAA, RIAA and Library (walking between destinations)
    • 7:45 - 9:00 Austin Grill
  • RSVP ENCOURAGED: <campaigns@fsf.org>

In total, the event will involve about 1.4 miles of walking. The sidewalks have wheelchair ramps and the all the locations we are visiting are wheelchair accessible.

April 19, 2016 07:50 PM

April 15, 2016

dejagnu @ Savannah

DejaGnu 1.6 released

DejaGnu 1.6 was released on April 15, 2016. Important changes include decent SSH support, many bug fixes and a much improved manual. Many old and defunct board files have been removed.

by Ben Elliston at April 15, 2016 10:42 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Rochester, MI)

Richard Stallman will speak about the goals and philosophy of the Free Software Movement, and the status and history of the GNU operating system, which in combination with the kernel Linux is now used by tens of millions of users world-wide.

Richard Stallman's speech will be nontechnical, admission is gratis, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Location: Banquet Room A, Oakland University, 2200 N Squirrel Road, Rochester, MI

Registration, which can be done anonymously, while not required, is appreciated; it will help us ensure we can accommodate all the people who wish to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Rochester.

April 15, 2016 02:50 PM

FSF Blogs

U.S. Federal Source Code Policy: FSF supports, and urges improvements - comment by April 18!

The text of the proposed policy and all comments are available, and we have also published our comment here on fsf.org.

The public comment period for this proposal is open through 11:59pm EDT on Monday, April 18, 2016. Email your comment to sourcecode@omb.eop.gov.

The proposal could be a big step in the right direction for the U.S., and in our comment, we suggest several improvements.

  • We urge the federal government to recognize and include the term "free software" and the Free Software Definition, indicating that this policy is designed to protect the autonomy of government and the rights of its people.
  • The proposal is to release 20% of custom code each year: we recommend releasing all code as free.
  • Additionally, free documentation should be included in the policy.
  • The federal government needs to address its contradictory habit of requiring or recommending the use of proprietary software, including non-free JavaScript.
  • The government should not require use of GitHub in order
    to contribute to government projects under this initiative -- our code repository criteria explain important concerns in this area.

You can submit your own comments regarding this proposal, supporting the FSF's suggestions and adding your own ideas for improvement, through 11:59pm EDT on Monday, April 18, 2016. Email your comment to sourcecode@omb.eop.gov.

April 15, 2016 02:45 PM

denemo @ Savannah

Version 2.0.6 is out

New Features:
Play Back Controls
Buttons to play selection or from cursor
Fix bugs with initial use
Mute Staffs
Mute/Un-mute all or groups of staffs
Whole Score Volume Override
Denemo Display
Upbeat bar numbering matches typesetter
LilyPond Error Reporting
Separate report for each run
Only report include filenames when they error
Playback View
Shift-Click to Navigate
Revert to simple MIDI while editing
Playback from Typeset View
Unified interface with Playback View
Lyrics
Insert Skips
Translations
Chinese (Simplified) Translation

by Richard Shann at April 15, 2016 02:43 PM

foliot @ Savannah

GNU Foliot version 0.9.6-beta is released.

This release fixes a serious GUI bug that appeared in GNU Foliot version 0.9.6-alpha: none of the Who , For whom and What combobox gtk entries where editable. Thanks to Juliana França who reported this bug.

See GNU Foliot's git summary and git log for a complete list and description of changes since version 0.9.6-alpha.

by David Pirotte at April 15, 2016 02:18 AM

April 13, 2016

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 15th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, April 15th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

April 13, 2016 08:48 PM

April 11, 2016

FSF News

Interpreting, enforcing and changing the GNU GPL, as applied to combining Linux and ZFS

The FSF's statement explains why the current license of ZFS prevents it from being combined with Linux. To reach that conclusion, the statement covers all the necessary background for understanding license incompatibilities and violations in general.

In January of 2005, the FSF added to its license list an explanation that the Common Development and Distribution License, version 1.0 (CDDL), though a free license, is incompatible with all versions of the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL). While the CDDL is not commonly used, it is the license that Sun Microsystems (and now Oracle) chose for distributing the file system ZFS. ZFS was originally written for Solaris, but recent projects aim to make it work as a module with other operating system kernels, including Linux, which is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL version 2.

"Normally, incompatibility questions like this are raised by people trying to write proprietary modules for copyleft free programs. They want to benefit from the work done by free software developers without providing others the same freedom, and they treat users unethically. That is not the case here, because ZFS is free software. The ideal solution would be for Oracle, who has become a large and tremendously influential distributor of GPL-covered code, to show their leadership by giving explicit permission allowing their ZFS work to be used under the GPL," said FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

FSF's executive director John Sullivan added, "The FSF does not develop Linux and does not presume to tell the developers of Linux when to do GPL enforcement. What we do is provide general materials that make clear the intent behind the GNU family of licenses, and the legal basis for that intent, to create shared and reliable best practices surrounding their use. As this statement makes clear, we support and encourage GPL enforcement work in this area and others when it is done in agreement with these best practices, and in accord with the Principles of Community-Oriented GPL Enforcement."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About the GNU Operating System and Linux

Richard Stallman announced in September 1983 the plan to develop a free software Unix-like operating system called GNU. GNU is the only operating system developed specifically for the sake of users' freedom. See https://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html.

In 1992, the essential components of GNU were complete, except for one, the kernel. When in 1992 the kernel Linux was re-released under the GNU GPL, making it free software, the combination of GNU and Linux formed a complete free operating system, which made it possible for the first time to run a PC without non-free software. This combination is the GNU/Linux system. For more explanation, see https://www.gnu.org/gnu/gnu-linux-faq.html.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

April 11, 2016 07:03 PM

GNUtls

April 09, 2016

www @ Savannah

April 08, 2016

FSF Blogs

New article by RMS, "When free software depends on non-free"

Richard Stallman's latest article, When Free Software Depends On Non-Free discusses different kinds of free software "traps" — when a free program's use depends unavoidably on a nonfree program — including the subtle but nefarious problem in which upgrading a free program requires using a nonfree programs. Stallman's various examples of different kinds of traps will help you be able to recognize them, and as he concludes in the article, "all it takes to avoid the trap is to recognize it."

April 08, 2016 08:30 PM

By April 10th: Urge the European Commission to adopt free software values when funding Internet improvements

Our friends at FSF Europe are highlighting an important opportunity to help direct 750 million Euro toward fixing the Internet using free software values and expertise:

The European Commission is about to allocate 750 million Euro over the next years on the "future internet", but the really important subjects (like: everything we learned from Edward Snowden) are not on their radar - yet.

However, if we bundle our efforts that is something that is definitely within reach. At the moment we are told there are only a couple of dozens of submissions from mostly the usual suspects, so your response would (at least on paper) count for influencing a few million Euro of this budget. It really makes a difference if you submit something, even if it is really short.

Read Matthias Kirschner's post for more details and for instructions on submitting your ideas.

April 08, 2016 08:13 PM

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 8th

Join the FSF and friends Friday, April 8th, from 12pm to 3pm EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory.

Participate in supporting the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.

Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!

If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today! There are also weekly FSD Meetings pages that everyone is welcome to contribute to before, during, and after each meeting.

April 08, 2016 03:12 PM

gnuzilla @ Savannah

IceCat 38.7.1 release

GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0.
https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/

The user manual pages are at http://libreplanet.org/wiki/Group:IceCat/
You can contribute by joining the wiki and editing the manuals.

Source tarballs, binaries for generic GNU/Linux systems and translations are available at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuzilla/38.7.1/
GPG key ID:D7E04784 GNU IceCat releases
Fingerprint: A573 69A8 BABC 2542 B5A0 368C 3C76 EED7 D7E0 4784
https://savannah.gnu.org/project/memberlist-gpgkeys.php?group=gnuzilla

Changes since v38.6.0

  • This is a maintenance release with no downstream changes.

by Ruben Rodriguez at April 08, 2016 02:46 AM