Planet GNU

Aggregation of development blogs from the GNU Project

September 30, 2014

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - encuentro para presentar al SO Jarro Negro - (Bogota, Colombia)

Richard Stallman tomará parte en un encuentro con educadores de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mejico, quienes presentarán una distribución GNU/Linux denominada Jarro Negro en la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Facultad de Tecnología, y asistirá a un taller sobre GNU/EMACS, con el fin de incentivar su utilización en el entorno académico.

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Bogotá.

September 30, 2014 09:20 AM

September 29, 2014

Riccardo Mottola

Improvements in GNUstep's native window look

In the past weeks, quite some polish was added in windows support.

First, there was a bug affecting Popup Menus and contextual menus that affected only certain computers. It was fixed.




Then the controls were not properly initialized. Native file-dialogs, for example, as well as upcoming print dialogs (work in progress by Gregory) did not fit the theme properly. On XP, Window 7 and Windows 8 they should follow the native look, instead they always got the "Win 95" look creating a strange mix.

The fix requires initializing Windows' controls. I put the initialization code inside the WinUX theme loading. If it will not prove safe, then it needs to be moved into NSApplication. Furthermore, an XML resource file to enable the correct loading.




I really does look nice, doesn't it?

by Riccardo (noreply@blogger.com) at September 29, 2014 04:11 PM

Nick Clifton

September 2014 GNU Toolchain Update

Hi Guys,

  In this month's news we have:
  
  * The GDB project is removing support for the following platforms:
    - MIPS IRIX (mips*-sgi-irix5*, mips*-sgi-irix6*)
    - Alpha Tru64 (alpha*-*-osf*)

    This only affect code maintained by GDB project (not binutils or GCC).  Also, support for any other target on MIPS (including embedded ones) will be maintained as is.

  * GCC now supports the MIPS R6 and ARM CORTEX-A17 architecture variants.

  * The is a new gcc attribute called no_reorder.  This tells GCC not to change the order of the marked functions and variables, relative to each other.  (Unmarked functions and variables can still be reordered).  This attribute is similar to the -fno-topleve-reorder option, except that it only applies to the marked symbols.

  * There is a new GCC command line optionn: -freport-bug

    This tells GCC to collect and dump debug information into temporary file if an internal compiler error occurs.  This information can be helpful to whomever has to fix the bug.

Cheers
  Nick

September 29, 2014 07:28 AM

September 28, 2014

guile-ncurses @ Savannah

guile-ncurses version 1.5 released

I am pleased to announce a new version of GNU guile-ncurses. guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is based on the ncurses project's curses, panel, form, and menu libraries.

This version is a bug-fix release with no new functionality.

The web page for GNU guile-ncurses is
http://www.gnu.org/software/guile-ncurses/

Its canonical download location is http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/guile-ncurses/

Or you can download it from a mirror at
http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/guile-ncurses/

The NEWS for this release is

- parallel 'make check' is now supported
- will now look for ncurses headers in <ncursesw/curses.h> as well
- the wcwidth procedure is not provided if it is not supported by the
underlying libraries
- update autoconfigury
- Cygwin: support pty devices with guile-ncurses-shell
- MinGW: avoid C library functions that are unavailable
- MinGW: building guile-ncurses-shell is no longer attempted
- MinGW: the libguile-ncurses dll is now unversioned so that Guile can
find it

by Mike Gran at September 28, 2014 09:47 PM

GNUCash News

September 27, 2014

pspp @ Savannah

PSPP 0.8.4 has been released.

I'm very pleased to announce the release of a new version of GNU PSPP. PSPP is a program for statistical analysis of sampled data. It is a free replacement for the proprietary program SPSS.

Changes from 0.8.3 to 0.8.4:

  • Formatting of SYSFILE INFO output was made easier to read.
  • Bug fixes, including the following notable ones:
    • FREQUENCIES works properly for string variables. (This bug was introduced in 0.8.2.)
    • CROSSTABS now correctly computes all of the measures that it offers. Some measures have been removed because they were not computed correctly.
    • The NPAR TESTS calculation of significance for the RUNS subcommand has been corrected.
    • Planned comparisons in ONEWAY ANOVA now correctly handle negative T-values.
    • Conformance fixes to Open Document output format.

Please send PSPP bug reports to bug-gnu-pspp@gnu.org.

by Ben Pfaff at September 27, 2014 10:06 PM

September 26, 2014

FSF Blogs

Recap of Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 26

Today's Friday Free Software Directory (FSD) IRC Meeting was focused on bug fixes. In particular, we fixed some HTTPS errors we were having with images, we found and deleted the rare spam entry or two that gets submitted, and we did some other minor house cleaning tasks. There were also some important conversations on what constitutes "corresponding source" of a work as well as further discussions of our art licensing policy. Free software licensing is an important and recurring topic in our weekly IRC meetings, but this week's discussion were especially interesting and thought provoking.

You, too, can join in on the fun. Find out how to attend our Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetings by checking our blog or subscribing to the RSS feed.

September 26, 2014 08:54 PM

Interview with Bitcoin Armory

Bitcoin Armory

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Alan Reiner, core developer of Bitcoin Armory, a bitcoin wallet focused on security. Bitcoin Armory is licensed under the terms of GNU Affero General Public License version 3, or (at your option) any later version.

Tell us about yourself and Bitcoin Armory

I am the CEO of Armory Technologies, Inc and core developer of Armory Bitcoin Wallet which is a popular, free software wallet application focused on security for enterprise business and advanced users. It was the first and only Bitcoin wallet to make "cold storage" (offline wallets) accessible through an intuitive user interface, and is one of the most trusted tools for securing and managing large bitcoin investments. I have degrees in applied mathematics and engineering mechanics, and additional background in statistics, data mining, and cryptography. I spent seven years developing image & video processing algorithms at a physics lab in Maryland before switching to Armory full-time and founding Armory Technologies, Inc in mid-2013. I became one of the top Bitcoin experts in the community, and a trusted source for security best practices and innovation. My goal is to pioneer the world of Bitcoin wallets, and make high-security easy to practice even for "regular" users.

What inspired you to create Bitcoin Armory?

There were no other Bitcoin wallets that provided the security features I wanted. I knew how to implement them, so I did it! It turns out other people wanted it, too.

How are people using it?

Of all the DIY Bitcoin wallets out there, Armory is the one focused most squarely on security. The software is trusted by some of the biggest Bitcoin holders to keep their coins secure, featuring backup, offline, and multi-sig features not available elsewhere.

What features do you think really sets Bitcoin Armory apart from similar software?

The ability to manage wallets/crypto keys that are kept on computers that are not internet-connected, yet be able to gather signatures from offline devices in a secure manner. And recently, the ability to do "multi-signature" transactions without a third-party service (all locally-run instances of our software). You can even combine the two and do anonymous cold-multisig. These are critical features for major investors and enterprise users and no other software has it.

Why did you choose the AGPL as Bitcoin Armory's license?

We wanted to make the project free software, as we don't believe that a piece of software as security-sensitive as ours could survive as a proprietary application. The ability for code auditing is critical when people perceive a risk that the developers could inject code to steal their money. However, we didn't want to limit our monetization options by picking a permissive license. AGPL gives us the ability to assert some control (and incentivises dual-licensing) while allowing us to keep all the source code free.

How can users (technical or otherwise) help contribute to Bitcoin Armory?

Bitcoin Armory software is now maintained by Armory Technologies, Inc. which is a for-profit startup that will focus on the needs of advanced and enterprise users. We have accepted code contributions before, but I doubt few would contribute anymore without being on our payroll. At this time we have 5 full-time developers, and we haven't had a non-paid contribution to the codebase in months.

If someone is interested in contributing, we'd encourage them to contact us and send us their resume. Due to the nature and sensitivity of our software, there's actually a pretty high learning curve to get over to be able to make meaningful contributions to the code (that are both effective and secure).

What's the next big thing for Bitcoin Armory?

We are working on some technical advancements, as well as promoting our enterprise services. On the technical side, we are focusing on multi-user encryption features that would allow enterprise clients to appoint a set of employees to manage each signing device, without any one employee having exclusive access. Hardware Security Modules (HSMs) are typically used for this purpose, but are extremely expensive ($20k+), and we wanted to be able to provide a pure-software solution that provides most of the same benefits on consumer hardware, especially for small businesses.

Further, we are ironing out our enterprise services, which will involve custom adaptations and plugins to the base free software project, as well as security consulting and training. There's a lot brewing and not enough time to do it all!

Enjoyed this interview? Check out our previous entry in this series featuring Stephen H. Dawson and the rest of the GNU Remotecontrol team.

September 26, 2014 07:58 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - «El Software Libre y Tu Libertad» (Bogota, Colombia)

Richard Stallman hablará sobre las metas y la filosofía del movimiento del Software Libre, y el estado y la historia del sistema operativo GNU, el cual junto con el núcleo Linux, es actualmente utilizado por decenas de millones de personas en todo el mundo.

Esa charla de Richard Stallman formará parte de la Semana Distrital de la Cultura Libre (2014-10-06--10). No será técnica y será abierta al público; todos están invitados a asistir.

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Bogotá.

September 26, 2014 09:55 AM

Greg Casamento

Recent Article About Swift Confirms Apple's Position

I really do hate being right sometimes.  I believe that's enough said on the subject, don't you?  All I know now is that action must be taken.   The era of closed source languages is over and has been for some time.

by GregC (noreply@blogger.com) at September 26, 2014 06:46 AM

September 25, 2014

FSF News

Free Software Foundation statement on the GNU Bash "shellshock" vulnerability

Bash is the GNU Project's shell; it is part of the suite of software that makes up the GNU operating system. The GNU programs plus the kernel Linux form a commonly used complete free software operating system, called GNU/Linux. The bug, which is being referred to as "shellshock," can allow, in some circumstances, attackers to remotely access and control systems using Bash (and programs that call Bash) as an attack vector, regardless of what kernel they are running. The bug probably affects many GNU/Linux users, along with those using Bash on proprietary operating systems like Apple's OS X and Microsoft Windows. Additional technical details about the issue can be found at CVE-2014-6271 and CVE-2014-7169.

GNU Bash has been widely adopted because it is a free (as in freedom), reliable, and featureful shell. This popularity means the serious bug that was published yesterday is just as widespread. Fortunately, GNU Bash's license, the GNU General Public License version 3, has facilitated a rapid response. It allowed Red Hat to develop and share patches in conjunction with Bash upstream developers efforts to fix the bug, which anyone can download and apply themselves. Everyone using Bash has the freedom to download, inspect, and modify the code -- unlike with Microsoft, Apple, or other proprietary software.

Software freedom is a precondition for secure computing; it guarantees everyone the ability to examine the code to detect vulnerabilities, and to create new and safe versions if a vulnerability is discovered. Your software freedom does not guarantee bug-free code, and neither does proprietary software: bugs happen no matter how the software is licensed. But when a bug is discovered in free software, everyone has the permission, rights, and source code to expose and fix the problem. That fix can then be immediately freely distributed to everyone who needs it. Thus, these freedoms are crucial for ethical, secure computing.

Proprietary, (aka nonfree) software relies on an unjust development model that denies users the basic freedom to control their computers. When software's code is kept hidden, it is vulnerable not only to bugs that go undetected, but to the easier deliberate addition and maintenance of malicious features. Companies can use the obscurity of their code to hide serious problems, and it has been documented that Microsoft provides intelligence agencies with information about security vulnerabilities before fixing them.

Free software cannot guarantee your security, and in certain situations may appear less secure on specific vectors than some proprietary programs. As was widely agreed in the aftermath of the OpenSSL "Heartbleed" bug, the solution is not to trade one security bug for the very deep insecurity inherently created by proprietary software -- the solution is to put energy and resources into auditing and improving free programs.

Development of Bash, and GNU in general, is almost exclusively a volunteer effort, and you can contribute. We are reviewing Bash development, to see if increased funding can help prevent future problems. If you or your organization use Bash and are potentially interested in supporting its development, please contact us.

The patches to fix this issue can be obtained directly at http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bash/.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

September 25, 2014 09:35 PM

FSF Blogs

Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 26

Join the FSF and friends on Friday, September 26, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (18:00 to 21:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. We will be on IRC in the #fsf channel on freenode.


Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.


While the Free Software Directory has been and continues to be a great resource to the world over the past decade, it has the potential of being a resource of even greater value. But it needs your help!


If you are eager to help and you can't wait or are simply unable to make it onto IRC on Friday, our participation guide will provide you with all the information you need to get started on helping the Directory today!

September 25, 2014 02:50 PM

September 24, 2014

rcs @ Savannah

RCS savannah project page

On the project page for RCS on savannah, the intro blurb now has a proper link to CVS, as well as a link to the tip jar page.

by Thien-Thi Nguyen at September 24, 2014 01:14 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman - «¿Por Qué es la Inclusión Digital un Bien o un Mal?» Fusagasugá, Colombia

Esa charla de Richard Stallman no será técnica y será abierta al público; todos están invitados a asistir.

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Fusagasugá.

September 24, 2014 11:10 AM

September 23, 2014

FSF Blogs

Tor Challenge hits it out of the park

Tor is a publicly accessible, free software-based system for anonymizing Internet traffic. It relies on thousands of computers around the world called relays, which route traffic in tricky ways to dodge spying. The more relays, the stronger and faster the network.

We'd like to warmly thank our allies at the Electronic Frontier Foundation for organizing the Tor Challenge and inviting us to join them in promoting it. And most of all, thanks to the 1,635 of you who started a relay! (The FSF would have started one too, but we've already been running ours for a while.)

The Tor Challenge has already been successful, but that doesn't mean it's too late to start a Tor relay! You can get started from the Challenge's beautifully-designed Web site.

To see stats and graphs about the Tor Challenge, read the EFF's post.

To learn about more tools and actions you can take to secure privacy for yourself and your community, see the FSF's bulk surveillance page. For a discussion of pushing back bulk surveillance on a mass scale, read Richard Stallman's article "How Much Surveillance Can Democracy Withstand?".

September 23, 2014 05:19 PM

September 22, 2014

FSF Events

GNU Guix organizes on-line hackathon (#guix IRC channel, Freenode)

The hackathon will take place primarily on-line, on the #guix IRC channel on Freenode. We have started collecting a list of hacking ideas. Feel free to stop by and make more suggestions!

The hackathon is accessible to anyone with experience in GNU/Linux packaging or systems hacking. Scheme programmers will find additional things to work on in the tool set. Finally, we will also be welcoming newcomers and helping them get started.

This is a followup to last year's hackathon, organized for GNU's 30th anniversary.

About GNU Guix:

GNU Guix is the functional package manager for the GNU system, and a distribution thereof.
In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. It also offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, with Guile Scheme programming interfaces.
At this stage the distribution can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el.

September 22, 2014 08:10 PM

parallel @ Savannah

GNU Parallel 20140922 ('Scotland') released

GNU Parallel 20140922 ('Scotland') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parallel/

Haiku of the month:

bash for loops vanquished
jobs fan out over network
collated results!

New in this release:

  • If the file give as --sshloginfile is changed it will be re-read when a job finishes though at most once per second. This makes it possible to add and remove hosts while running.
  • Bug fixes and man page updates.

GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.

About GNU Parallel

GNU Parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job is can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. GNU Parallel can then split the input and pipe it into commands in parallel.

If you use xargs and tee today you will find GNU Parallel very easy to use as GNU Parallel is written to have the same options as xargs. If you write loops in shell, you will find GNU Parallel may be able to replace most of the loops and make them run faster by running several jobs in parallel. GNU Parallel can even replace nested loops.

GNU Parallel makes sure output from the commands is the same output as you would get had you run the commands sequentially. This makes it possible to use output from GNU Parallel as input for other programs.

You can find more about GNU Parallel at: http://www.gnu.org/s/parallel/

You can install GNU Parallel in just 10 seconds with: (wget -O - pi.dk/3 || curl pi.dk/3/) | bash

Watch the intro video on http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

Walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). Your commandline will love you for it.

When using programs that use GNU Parallel to process data for publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU Parallel - The Command-Line Power Tool, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, February 2011:42-47.

About GNU SQL

GNU sql aims to give a simple, unified interface for accessing databases through all the different databases' command line clients. So far the focus has been on giving a common way to specify login information (protocol, username, password, hostname, and port number), size (database and table size), and running queries.

The database is addressed using a DBURL. If commands are left out you will get that database's interactive shell.

When using GNU SQL for a publication please cite:

O. Tange (2011): GNU SQL - A Command Line Tool for Accessing Different Databases Using DBURLs, ;login: The USENIX Magazine, April 2011:29-32.

About GNU Niceload

GNU niceload slows down a program when the computer load average (or other system activity) is above a certain limit. When the limit is reached the program will be suspended for some time. If the limit is a soft limit the program will be allowed to run for short amounts of time before being suspended again. If the limit is a hard limit the program will only be allowed to run when the system is below the limit.

by Ole Tange at September 22, 2014 05:35 PM

GNU MediaGoblin

MediaGoblin 0.7.1 released

MediaGoblin 0.7.1 has been released! This is a bugfix release building on MediaGoblin 0.7.0.

Upgrading is highly encouraged to those running postgresql databases especially. There were some issues in the previous release that lead to users of postgresql to see random errors. We had some problems related to a couple of (non-critical) features not handling transactions well… these have been disabled for this release, but will likely be re-enabled by 0.8.0’s release.

Thanks to everyone who made this release possible: Andrew Browning, Christopher Allan Webber, Jessica Tallon, Low Kian Seong, Matt Molyneaux, and Odin Hørthe Omdal. Thanks so much!

Please see the release notes for details. Happy goblin’ing!

by Christopher Allan Webber at September 22, 2014 03:00 PM

September 19, 2014

FSF Blogs

Happy Software Freedom Day!

This Saturday, September 20th, people everywhere are getting together to celebrate free software. Install parties, encryption workshops, hackathons, you name it. Here in Massachusetts, FSF Web developer David Thompson is running a getting-started workshop for F-Droid, the free software app repository for devices running Android-based operating systems like Replicant.

Wondering what to do for Software Freedom Day? Take a page out of Dave's book and share your favorite free software application with a friend. What better way to celebrate than exercising freedom 2 of free software's four freedoms with your community? If you're on GNU Social or Pump.io or even Twitter, tell us (@FSF) which application you're sharing with the hashtag #SFD (see our thoughts about Twitter).

This is the eleventh year of Software Freedom Day, and people are holding events in almost 100 countries. Thanks, everyone involved for reminding us how active, creative and inspiring the free software movement is. However you choose to celebrate, have a great Software Freedom Day!

Image CC BY 3.0 Unported Software Freedom Day.

September 19, 2014 07:50 PM

FSF Events

LibrePlanet 2015: Free Software Everywhere (Cambridge, MA)

This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "Free Software Everywhere." We're looking for talks that touch on the many places and ways that free software is used around the world, as well as ways to make free software ubiquitous. Think "where" in the broadest sense of the word--it's not just geography-based talks we're after. What are some contexts where free software is thriving, and some others where it needs a push? How have you worked to gain a foothold for free software in your company or community? And what about free software on all of the myriad pieces of hardware we use, including laptops, phones, tablets, and even coffee makers? At LibrePlanet 2015, we're taking software freedom around the world, to outer space, and through all kinds of industries, governments, organizations, fields of study, and communities.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around the Boston area.

September 19, 2014 03:12 PM

Software Freedom Day celebration (Montreal, Canada)

FACIL, pour l'appropriation collective de l'informatique libre (FACIL), a non-profit organization focused on the adoption, usage and democratisation of software freedom, invites FSF members and friends to the Software Freedom Day celebration in Quebec. The celebration will also open the Semaine québécoise de l'informatique libre (SQIL), which will run from September 20th to 28th.

The event est free and everyone is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Montreal.

September 19, 2014 01:50 PM

Semaine Quebecoise de l'Informatique Libre (Montreal, Canada)

FACIL, pour l'appropriation collective de l'informatique libre (FACIL), a non-profit organization focused on the adoption, usage and democratisation of software freedom, invites FSF members and friends to the Software Freedom Day celebration in Quebec. The celebration will open the Semaine québécoise de l'informatique libre (SQIL), which will run from September 20th to 28th.

The event est free and everyone is encouraged to attend.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Montreal.

September 19, 2014 01:49 PM

September 18, 2014

rcs @ Savannah

RCS 5.9.3 available

GNU RCS (Revision Control System) 5.9.3 is available.

The full announcement was posted to the info-gnu mailing list:

Additionally, the main page for RCS on Savannah now notes that GNU RCS is provided under the terms of the GNU GPLv3+. (This has been the case since version 5.8, released 2011-08-30.)

by Thien-Thi Nguyen at September 18, 2014 12:06 PM

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in Thiruvananthapuram, India

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical and the public is encouraged to attend.

Topic to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Thiruvananthapuram.

September 18, 2014 09:50 AM

GNUtls

GnuTLS 3.3.8 and 3.2.18

Released GnuTLS 3.3.8, and 3.2.18, which are bug-fix releases on the next, and current stable branches respectively.

by Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos (nmav@gnutls.org) at September 18, 2014 12:00 AM

September 17, 2014

FSF Events

Richard Stallman to speak in London

This speech by Richard Stallman will be nontechnical, admission is free of charge, and the public is encouraged to attend.

Time and detailed location to be determined.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around London.

September 17, 2014 09:42 PM

Richard Stallman va a dar una charla en La Rioja

Esa charla de Richard Stallman no será técnica y será abierta al público; todos están invitados a asistir.

Favor de rellenar este formulario, para que podamos contactarle acerca de eventos futuros en la región de Logroño.

El título, el lugar exacto, y la hora de la charla serán determinados.

September 17, 2014 08:30 PM

September 16, 2014

FSF Blogs

LibrePlanet is coming March 21-22, 2015: Propose a session!

Our Call for Sessions is open now, and you can also apply to volunteer or exhibit at LibrePlanet 2015. General registration will open in October.

You've got until Sunday, November 2nd, 2014 at 19:59 EST (23:59 UTC) to submit your proposals. We can't wait to see what you come up with!

This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "Free Software Everywhere." We're looking for talks that touch on the many places and ways that free software is used around the world, as well as ways to make free software ubiquitous. Think "everywhere" in the broadest sense of the word--it's not just geography-based talks we're after. What are some contexts where free software is thriving, and some others where it needs a push? How have you worked to advance free software in your company or community? And what about free software on all of the myriad pieces of hardware we use, including laptops, phones, tablets, and even coffee makers? At LibrePlanet 2015, we're taking software freedom around the world, to outer space, and considering its role in industry, government, academia, community organizing, and personal computing.

Should I submit a session proposal for LibrePlanet?

Yes! We encourage speakers of all experience levels to submit a proposal. LibrePlanet is a great place for new and seasoned speakers alike. While LibrePlanet always includes technical talks, our program also emphasizes non-technical topics and topics that are appropriate for newcomers. We are especially interested to see proposals from people who use free software or apply its values for social benefit, from academic research to community organizing, education to medicine and the arts. LibrePlanet is committed to increasing the participation of speakers belonging to groups traditionally underrepresented at free software conferences, including women and people of color.

Some ideas for sessions

  • Sharing a story of how free software has been applied for social benefit
  • Tackling a threat or organizing challenge facing the free software movement
  • Demonstrating a new and exciting piece of software or development within an existing software project
  • Engaging youth, the future of the free software movement. We're looking for proposals for all age groups, from young children, to high school age, to college students
  • Thinking critically about challenges and opportunities facing the movement, and charting a path to victory
  • Bringing a key part of free software history to life
  • Giving newcomers a way to learn about free software principles and philosophy, and/or giving newcomers a way to start using free software in their daily lives

At LibrePlanet, we are looking for sessions that embrace the free software movement's ideals and also its language. For example, using "free software" is better than using "open source."

Volunteer for LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet depends on volunteer support during the planning process all the way through the event. We're looking for volunteers who want to help us with the planning and preparation work for LibrePlanet. Learn more about volunteering and sign up at LibrePlanet.org.

Promotional opportunities at LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the perfect place to spread the word about your organization to an inspired and engaged audience. We have two kinds of promotional opportunities for LibrePlanet 2015: exhibit tables and sponsorships. Exhibit tables will be located in a highly visible primary thoroughfare. Your table and program acknowledgement will reach hundreds of software developers, free software activists, academics, students, and computer users. You can apply for an exhibit table at LibrePlanet.org. Exhibitors will be accepted on a rolling basis until the hall fills, so apply early!

What makes LibrePlanet so special is the amazing contributions from our speakers, exhibitors, and volunteers. We can't wait to hear your ideas!

September 16, 2014 08:04 PM

FSF News

LibrePlanet is coming March 21-22, 2015, call for proposals now open for annual free software conference

LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts. The conference brings together software developers, policy experts, activists and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments and face challenges to software freedom. Newcomers are always welcome, and LibrePlanet 2015 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.

This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "Free Software Everywhere." The call for sessions seeks talks that touch on the many places and ways that free software is used around the world, as well as ways to make free software ubiquitous. Proposals are encouraged to consider "everywhere" in the broadest sense of the word. LibrePlanet 2015 will take software freedom around the world, to outer space, and consider its role in industry, government, academia, community organizing, and personal computing.

"LibrePlanet is one of the most rewarding things we do all year. This conference brings people from all over the planet who want to make the world a better place with free software," said John Sullivan, executive director of the FSF.

Call for Sessions

"I hope we'll receive session proposals from people with all levels of speaking and technical experience; you don't have to be a coder to speak at LibrePlanet. Free software users, activists, academics, policymakers, developers, and others are all key contributors to the free software movement, and we want to showcase all of these skills at LibrePlanet 2015," said Libby Reinish, a campaigns manager at the FSF.

Call for sessions applications are currently being accepted at https://www.libreplanet.org/2015/call_for_sessions and are due by Sunday, November 2nd, 2014 at 19:59 EST (23:59 UTC).**

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation, and is co-produced by the Student Information Processing Board. What was once a small gathering of FSF members has grown into a larger event for anyone with an interest in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet is always gratis for associate members of the FSF. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2015, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2015.

LibrePlanet 2014 was held at MIT from March 22-23, 2014. Over 350 attendees from all over the world came together for conversations, demonstrations, and keynotes centered around the theme of "Free Software, Free Society." You can watch videos from past conferences at http://media.libreplanet.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 - 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

###

September 16, 2014 07:56 PM

guix @ Savannah

Join us for a Guix hackathon on Sep. 27-28!

The GNU Guix project is organizing a hackathon on September 27th and 28th, 2014. The hackathon will take place primarily on-line, on the #guix IRC channel on Freenode. We have started collecting a list of hacking ideas. Feel free to stop by and make more suggestions!

The hackathon is accessible to anyone with experience in GNU/Linux packaging or systems hacking. Scheme programmers will find additional things to work on in the tool set. Finally, we will also be welcoming newcomers and helping them get started.

This is a followup to last year's hackathon, organized for GNU's 30th anniversary.

About GNU Guix

GNU Guix is the functional package manager for the GNU system, and a distribution thereof.

In addition to standard package management features, Guix supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and garbage collection. It also offers a declarative approach to operating system configuration management. Guix uses low-level mechanisms from the Nix package manager, with Guile Scheme programming interfaces.

At this stage the distribution can be used on an i686 or x86_64 machine. It is also possible to use Guix on top of an already installed GNU/Linux system, including on mips64el.

by Ludovic Courtès at September 16, 2014 07:58 AM